This experience is optimized for Internet Explorer version 9 and above.

Please upgrade your browser

Priority Code

Cancel
New Releases
New Releases
  • Learning to Play Guitar: Chords, Scales, and Solos

    Professor Colin McAllister, D.M.A.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    The guitar is one of the most accessible, versatile, and easy to learn instruments you can play. Get lessons and tips from expert, such as how a simple group of four guitar chords enables you to play hundreds of songs. Even if you already play the guitar, this course will broaden your knowledge by applying music theory, history, and expanding your repertoire of songs and styles.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Learning to Play Guitar: Chords, Scales, and Solos
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Guitar Basics: Play a Song in 60 Seconds
      Discover how you can play a simple song on the guitar in just one minute. Then study the parts of the guitar, and how to hold the instrument. Play G and C major chords, and review the classic bass line from the song you learned. Finally, practice your song, combining your bass line with a four-note melody. x
    • 2
      Tuning Up, Reading Music, and Dexterity
      Consider important principles of musical learning, the essence of practice, and the importance of performance. Investigate how to tune your guitar, and learn a useful warmup. Observe how pitch and rhythm are notated (written), practice E and A minor chords, and work with a musical number using the chords you've learned so far. x
    • 3
      Classical Guitar Position and Posture
      Explore body posture with the instrument; then, practice your warmup using alternating fingers. Grasp how written music is divided into “measures” and “beats”. Learn fuller versions of G and C major chords, see how they are written in the tablature form of notation, and add a melody to the song from the last lesson. x
    • 4
      Learning How to Practice the Guitar
      Look deeper into how to practice and master each element in the learning process. Explore “shifting”—moving the left hand position in guitar playing. Then grasp how the lower three strings are notated, and practice moving between chords on the instrument. Play a major scale, and use it in the song “Shifting Sands”. x
    • 5
      Playing Fingerstyle Guitar
      Learn about three legends of “fingerstyle” guitar--the technique of playing with the right-hand thumb and fingers. Practice the basics of right-hand fingerstyle technique, with alternating fingers. Study the notation of open strings; then extend your fingerstyle to “fingering” chords. Play a G major scale across three strings, and use your fingerstyle in a song. x
    • 6
      Playing Rhythm Guitar
      Discover the leading lights of “rhythm guitar”, a playing style where the guitarist provides the rhythmic foundation for a band. Review your fingerstyle technique, and play arpeggios (broken chords). Learn to play eighth-notes, and “¾” or waltz-like rhythms. Practice a two-octave scale, some melodic patterns or “licks”, and put these elements together in today’s song. x
    • 7
      The Pentatonic Scale
      Look into the remarkable guitar-playing of Eric Johnson, and his use of the pentatonic (five-tone) scale. Learn a left-hand exercise for “walking” across the fretboard; then study half-step intervals on the guitar and how to read them. Investigate syncopated strumming patterns, the two-octave pentatonic scale, and how to use them in improvising. x
    • 8
      The Blues Scale and Lateral Stretching
      Enter the world of the blues, and learn about some pioneering pre-war blues players. For left hand technique, practice a “lateral stretching” exercise for flexibility. Add the A7 chord, along with syncopated blues strumming patterns and the A blues scale. Last, play “Blues for Art”, incorporating your new strumming patterns and the blues scale. x
    • 9
      Planting for Control and Accuracy
      First, contemplate the principles of tonal beauty, as taught by the great Romero brothers. Study the technique of “planting”, an aid for technical accuracy. Learn the D and A major chords, and how to read key signatures. Then play a new melody in D major, and accompany it in fingerstyle using your new chords. x
    • 10
      Guitar Tremolo: Gaining Speed
      Here, encounter two classical guitar titans, Agustín Barrios and Andrés Segovia, and grasp their contributions to the instrument. Study tremolo, which gives the illusion of a sustained note. Learn to read sixteenth-notes, add the E major chord, the major pentatonic scale, and use your tremolo and finger technique in the “Raindrop Etude”. x
    • 11
      Legato and Power Chords
      Begin with legato technique (also called “hammer-ons” and “pull-offs”), a way of smoothly connecting guitar tones without plucking the string. Then add the two-note “power chord” to your repertoire, a key chord for rock music. Practice some patterns (“licks”) using the minor pentatonic scale, and put all of these elements together in a rock song. x
    • 12
      Travis Picking for Folk, Country, and Rock
      Trace the remarkable life of Merle Travis, who pioneered a distinctive and highly influential fingerpicking style. Refine your descending legato technique (“pull-offs”), a great exercise for strength and finger independence. Study the “Travis picking” style, practice some melodic licks using pull-offs, and try Travis picking in the blues tune “Dusty Blue”. x
    • 13
      Hammer-Ons and Pull-Offs
      Hear classic road stories of some great guitar players, as they point to the collaborative roles of the guitar. Learn the B7, C7, and G7 chords (“dominant seventh” chords), and grasp their role in musical harmony. Play the scale of E major across all six strings; then use your legato technique, dominant sevenths, and E major scale in accompanying a singer. x
    • 14
      Finger Independence and Chord Theory
      Explore harmonic tension and resolution, and the dominant and tonic chords, through compelling examples in the music of Richard Wagner. Practice an important exercise for independent movement of the left hand fingers. Discover how three-note chords (“triads”) can be constructed from the notes of the scale. Finally, play an original song using the material from this lesson. x
    • 15
      Crosspicking and Bass Lines
      Uncover the legend and innovations of Doc Watson, the great bluegrass player who was brought out of obscurity by a chance meeting. Study the challenges of playing with a pick while moving across the strings. Then taste “barre” chords, a useful technique you’ll explore further, learn the C major scale, and try a tune inspired by Johnny Cash. x
    • 16
      Piano-Style Guitar and Fingernail Care
      Investigate the musical effects created by the fingernails versus the fingertips, and grasp the basics of nail shaping and care for guitar playing. Then study chord “qualities” (major, minor, diminished), and look at common chord patterns and sequences. In today’s song, practice “piano-style” guitar, playing melody and accompaniment simultaneously. x
    • 17
      Syncopated Strumming and Movable Scales
      Begin with some memorable stories that illustrate the challenges of performance. Practice “chromatic octaves”, for hand coordination and flexibility, and learn to read “dotted” eighth notes. Experiment with different ways to play common chords, study “movable” scales (that use the same fingering pattern), and use these elements in an original tune. x
    • 18
      A New Pentatonic Scale and the Capo
      Explore the work of composer John Cage, as it points to the value of musical “silence”—the space between notes. Then learn to read musical “rests” (silences in the music). Study how to use the capo, a device used to shorten the guitar’s string length. Continue your work with “movable” pentatonic and major scales, and revive your “Travis picking” skills for today’s tune. x
    • 19
      Barre Chords: Movable Chords
      Delve into the original style of jazz guitarist Johnny Smith, and the story behind one of his greatest hits. Then go deeper into barre chords, one of the most challenging guitar techniques. Learn “movable” chord shapes, using the same fingering for multiple chords, and practice two-octave arpeggios (broken chords). End with a reggae-style song, structured in “A-A-B-A” form. x
    • 20
      Flamenco Technique: Rasgueado
      This lecture explores the flamenco style, highlighting the career and historic innovations of Paco de Lucia. Study the flamenco strumming technique of rasgueado. Learn to harmonize melody notes, practice movable A, Am and A7 chords, and expand your work with arpeggios. End with a flamenco-tinged song, using your new rasgueado, chords, and melodic technique. x
    • 21
      Playing with Natural Harmonics
      Learn to play the beautiful, chiming guitar tones called harmonics. First, explore the lives of some great players who featured them. Then play harmonics on all six strings, and see how they’re notated. Practice four-note diatonic seventh chords, and investigate modes, permutations of the major scale. Use your new chords and harmonics in the tune “Harmonic Landscapes". x
    • 22
      Jazz Harmony and Dorian Mode
      Take the measure of guitarist Charlie Christian and alto saxophonist Charlie Parker, each of whom transformed jazz and their instruments. Grasp how to work for greater speed and accuracy when playing melodies. Learn “movable” chord shapes for major and minor seventh chords, practice the Dorian modal scale, and use them in a minor blues tune. x
    • 23
      DADGAD Tuning and Lydian Mode
      Take a look at the far-reaching influence of acoustic guitarist Michael Hedges, and his ingenious use of alternate tunings of the instrument. Continue with a two-part cross-picking exercise, for hand dexterity. Practice the Lydian modal scale. Then explore alternate tunings, focusing on Michael Hedges’ “D-A-D-G-A-D” tuning, and use it in the song “Alpine Sunrise". x
    • 24
      Taking the Guitar to the Next Level
      Trace the career of violinist Malcolm Watson, as it illustrates principles of success for musicians, and consider seven habits of highly effective guitar players. Then learn the technique of artificial harmonics. Add half diminished and full diminished chords to your repertoire, play the Mixolydian scale, and finish the course with a jazz and flamenco inspired song. x
  • The Theory of Everything: The Quest to Explain All Reality

    Professor Don Lincoln, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Taught by noted physicist Dr. Don Lincoln of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, this course follows the search for a theory that explains all physical reality—a theory of everything. Dr. Lincoln covers recent developments in particle physics and cosmology, plus the background needed to appreciate the centuries-long search for this holy grail of science. Only high-school-level math is used.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The Theory of Everything: The Quest to Explain All Reality
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Two Prototype Theories of Everything
      Embark with Dr. Lincoln on a search for a theory of everything-a simple and comprehensive explanation for all physical phenomena in the universe. Confront the incompatibility of our two best prototypes: the standard model of particle physics and the general theory of relativity. x
    • 2
      The Union of Electricity and Magnetism
      Learn how two seemingly separate phenomena, electricity and magnetism, were shown by James Clerk Maxwell in the 1860s to be aspects of a single underlying force, demonstrating how unification works in physics. Then see how Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism make a remarkable prediction. x
    • 3
      Particles and Waves: The Quantum World
      Follow one of the strangest turns in modern science: the discovery of the paradoxical world of light, which spawned the theory of quantum mechanics. Discover how light and matter behave as both particles and waves, and look at evidence for this curious feature of the quantum world. x
    • 4
      Einstein Unifies Space, Time, and Light
      Trace the reasoning that led Einstein to his special theory of relativity, proposed in 1905. Address common misconceptions about this startling new view of time and space, which led to ideas such as mass-energy equivalence, the impossibility of faster-than-light travel, and the space-time continuum. x
    • 5
      Relativistic Quantum Fields and Feynman
      Take a deeper step into the quantum world, observing how the theory of quantum electrodynamics, or QED, unites quantum mechanics with special relativity. Discover that the handy sketches of subatomic behavior called Feynman diagrams (named after physicist Richard Feynman) are really equations in disguise. x
    • 6
      Neutrinos Violating Parity and the Weak Force
      Study the weak nuclear force, which is responsible for beta decay: the emission of an electron from a nucleus during radioactive decay. Discover that much more is going on, including weird transformations that pose a challenge to a theory of everything. x
    • 7
      Flavor Changes via the Weak Force
      Analyze more idiosyncrasies of the weak force, focusing on the three massive particles that mediate its interactions. Discover that the weak force is unique in its ability to change a characteristic called flavor, and learn that at high energies the weak force is exceptionally strong. x
    • 8
      Electroweak Unification via the Higgs Field
      A key step in the quest for a theory of everything has been the realization that the electromagnetic and weak forces are aspects of the same force. Follow the saga of electroweak unification, which culminated in the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. x
    • 9
      Quarks, Color, and the Strong Force
      Explore the force that helps hold the atomic nucleus together, called the strong force. Chart the discovery of this mysterious mechanism-which only works at extremely short range-and see how it led to concepts such as quarks, gluons, and the color force, which is responsible for the strong interaction. x
    • 10
      Standard Model Triumphs and Challenges
      Bring together all the concepts studied so far to gauge how close physicists are to a theory of everything. Focus on the shortcomings of the standard model. Then zero in on two burning questions: Why is the mass of the Higgs boson so low, and why does matter predominate over antimatter? x
    • 11
      How Neutrino Identity Oscillates
      Transition to a new perspective as Professor Lincoln spotlights speculative ideas that may contribute to a theory of everything. In this lecture, explore the mysteries of neutrinos, which are extraordinarily hard to detect yet hold intriguing clues about the possible unity of fundamental forces. x
    • 12
      Conservation Laws and Symmetry: Emmy Noether
      Consider why mathematics is such an effective tool for describing nature. Then focus on mathematician Emmy Noether's remarkable insight that links symmetries in the equations of a physical system to conservation laws, such as the conservation of energy and conservation of momentum. x
    • 13
      Theoretical Symmetries and Mathematics
      The first inklings of a successful theory of everything will probably arise from symmetries and group theory. Prepare for this epochal moment by digging into these important mathematical ideas. Also, learn to approach proposed theories of everything with fascination, tinged with healthy skepticism. x
    • 14
      Balancing Force and Matter: Supersymmetry
      One of the most attractive ideas for physicists searching for a theory of everything is supersymmetry, which treats force- and matter-carrying particles as interchangeable. Explore major problems that supersymmetry solves and the shortcomings that convince some scientists that perhaps some other ideas must also be considered. x
    • 15
      Why Quarks and Leptons?
      The fundamental building blocks of matter are thought to be quarks (which interact by the strong force) and leptons (which interact by the electromagnetic and weak forces). But could there be a deeper level? Explore the theory of preons, which may be even more fundamental than quarks and leptons. x
    • 16
      Newton's Gravity Unifies Earth and Sky
      Gravity is by far the weakest of the fundamental forces. Learn how Newton achieved the first major unification in physics by showing that terrestrial and celestial gravity are the same. He also tacitly equated inertial mass and gravitational mass, leading to the startling theory 250 years later. x
    • 17
      Einstein's Gravity Bends Space-Time
      Built on the equivalence of inertial and gravitational mass, Einstein's general theory of relativity explains gravity in a surprising new way. See how matter and energy determine the shape of space and time. Investigate confirming evidence for general relativity, including the discovery of gravitational waves in 2015. x
    • 18
      What Holds Each Galaxy Together: Dark Matter
      Trace the discovery of missing mass surrounding most galaxies, which leads scientists to infer that 85% of all matter is "dark" and can't be observed directly. Evaluate the major theories about this discrepancy, and consider its implications for a theory of everything. x
    • 19
      What Pushes the Universe Apart: Dark Energy
      Turn to dark energy, the ghostly energy field that appears to be pushing the universe apart at an ever-greater rate. Learn how this extraordinary discovery was made in 1998, and explore theories that attempt to explain dark energy and its strange consequences. x
    • 20
      Quantum Gravity: Einstein, Strings, and Loops
      A theory of everything must fit gravity into the quantum realm, reconciling the general theory of relativity with the standard model of particle physics. Explore the features of gravity that make this unification so difficult, and evaluate two intriguing approaches: superstring theory and loop quantum gravity. x
    • 21
      From Weak Gravity to Extra Dimensions
      Venture into extra dimensions to investigate gravity's extraordinary weakness compared to the other fundamental forces. This journey also sheds light on the possible creation of subatomic black holes in particle accelerators and why tiny black holes pose no risk to humanity. x
    • 22
      Big Bang and Inflation Explain Our Universe
      Starting with the big bang, plot the history of our universe, focusing on events in the tiniest fraction of the first second, when phenomena such as supersymmetry, superstrings, and quantum loops may have come into play. Consider the explanatory power of the theory of cosmic inflation. x
    • 23
      Free Parameters and Other Universes
      Now step into the realm of other universes. Do they exist? If so, how could we possibly know? Start by examining the free parameters that govern the structure and behavior of our universe. Then seek answers to four crucial questions that address why the parameters take the values that they do. x
    • 24
      Toward a Final Theory of Everything
      Finish the course by reviewing unified theories since Newton, analyzing a remarkable equation that brings major insights together and represents the current status of a theory of everything. Then look ahead to the next steps, and hear Dr. Lincoln's own research agenda for this momentous quest. x
  • America's Founding Fathers

    Professor Allen C. Guelzo, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    In collaboration with Smithsonian, the Great Courses presents America’s Founding Fathers, a deep dive into the creation of the U.S. Constitution as it actually happened. Using the Founding Fathers as a lens through which to see powerful truths about the early political history of the United States, you’ll better understand both the document under which Americans live and the people who, for better or worse, brought it into being.

    View Lecture List (36)
    36 Lectures  |  America's Founding Fathers
    Lecture Titles (36)
    • 1
      George Washington's Doubts
      Could the American experiment succeed? George Washington, one of the most iconic Founders, had strong doubts. After explaining the importance of getting a well-rounded understanding of the Founders, Professor Guelzo explores Washington's fears about post-Revolutionary America and his concerns about how people could administer their own affairs. x
    • 2
      Thomas Mifflin's Congress
      Before the ratification of the Constitution, there were presidents not of the United States but of the Congress created by the Articles of Confederation. As you'll discover, the failures of one president, Thomas Mifflin, offer a window into the potent problems facing the United States of America in 1783. x
    • 3
      Robert Morris's Money
      Money issues abounded in the new United States. Why was the abundance of land (and the lack of hard coin) such a problem? What compelled states to print so much of their own unsecure paper money? How did Robert Morris attempt to restore the links between commerce, agriculture, and government finances? x
    • 4
      Benjamin Franklin's Leather Apron
      No one in the 1780s defined the idea of an “American” as much as Benjamin Franklin. Here, explore the many roles Franklin played in the formative years of the republic: as independent printer, public “gentleman,” nobleman of nature, and tradesman cynical of the wealthy and powerful. x
    • 5
      Thomas Jefferson's Books
      Explore how books by Enlightenment thinkers like John Locke and Adam Smith influenced Thomas Jefferson's political philosophy. Also, consider Jefferson's fierce critiques of religion and commerce, and the ways he nevertheless betrayed (as a large-scale slave owner) the Enlightenment principles he held so dear. x
    • 6
      Daniel Shays's Misbehavior
      Shays's Rebellion would spark unease not just about tax increases and their impact on landowners - but on the entire Confederation. As you follow this dramatic insurgency and its fascinating leader, you'll learn how Shays's Rebellion prompted many to consider a strong government as essential to liberty and property. x
    • 7
      Alexander Hamilton's Republic
      Professor Guelzo takes you inside Alexander Hamilton's views about the American Republic: the fictions of hierarchy and aristocracy; the voluntary compact between rulers and ruled; the division of power into small packets; and his suspicions of the behavior of the Confederation Congress. x
    • 8
      James Madison's Conference
      How did James Madison become the prime mover of the United States Constitution? The key, it turns out, is a 1786 conference he organized between several states. Originally intended to discuss commercial regulations, the assembly would transform into a deliberation over how to put the Confederation out of business. x
    • 9
      Patrick Henry's Religion
      Come to see Patrick Henry in a new light: as the most self-contradictory—and most often defeated—Founder. Topics include the influence on Henry of the Reverend Samuel Davies, how the Awakeners shaped his brilliant oratorical skills, the public funding of Christianity, and his unremarkable accomplishments as governor of Virginia. x
    • 10
      James Madison's Vices
      In a private study, James Madison detailed what he called “the vices of the political system of the United States.” Here, explore these vices, including state failure to comply with constitutional requisitions and the provincial nature of state legislatures. Also, examine his most important suggestions for a new frame of government. x
    • 11
      Edmund Randolph's Plan
      Go inside the start of the Constitutional Convention, where you'll learn how and why the Founders assembled to craft a new, improved system of government. Central to this was the plan set out by Edmund Randolph, which aimed at stopping a jealous Congress or greedy state legislatures from destroying it. x
    • 12
      William Paterson's Dissent
      One speech by William Paterson, a member of the New Jersey delegation, halted the Randolph Plan from sailing smoothly to adoption. What were Paterson's arguments? Why did he support a simple amendment to the Articles of Confederation instead of a rewrite? What did his alternative plan look like? x
    • 13
      Roger Sherman's Compromise
      Turn to a moment of great exhaustion at the Constitutional Convention: a deadlock between the New Jersey and Virginia plans for a national government. Roger Sherman's compromise of two branches of government (one equal, one proportional) would play an important role in moving the debate forward. x
    • 14
      Elbridge Gerry's Committee
      Discover how the report by the Convention’s Grand Committee, chaired by Elbridge Gerry, ended the first great battle over the U.S. Constitution. As you’ll find out, it settled for good what the American Congress would look like – but also raised an issue that would soon dominate the debates: slavery. x
    • 15
      James Wilson's Executive
      Turn now to the next great issue facing the Convention: the shape of the new national executive. After pondering some of the concerns and fears the delegates had about executive power, you'll focus on James Wilson's argument for the need of an executive chosen not by Congress but by national election. x
    • 16
      John Rutledge's Committee
      John Rutledge’s Committee of Detail answered the call to help answer unresolved questions about the role of the national executive. Here, learn how “Dictator John” helped develop a working document that included a number of features now seen as the cornerstone of American constitutionalism. x
    • 17
      Rufus King's Slaves
      It was Rufus King who, at the debates, questioned the admission of slaves into the rule of representation. First, explore the dissonance between liberty and slavery in the new United States. Then, come to see how Rufus King predicted the angry tiger slavery would become in America. x
    • 18
      David Brearley's Postponed Parts
      The Committee on Postponed Parts, headed by David Brearley, was the Convention's most effective committee. Its business, as you'll learn, was to reconcile demands about the shape of the new national president. You'll also learn about the Committee on Style, whose sole task was to wordsmith the Convention's agreements into a single document. x
    • 19
      John Dunlap and David Claypoole's Broadside
      One day after the Constitutional Convention ended, the document was printed in 500 copies by John Dunlap and David Claypoole and shared with the general public. What happened next? How did George Washington use a cover letter to mitigate shock? How did the Founders brace themselves for the inevitable state conventions? x
    • 20
      Alexander Hamilton's Papers
      Chief Justice John Marshall would call the Federalist Papers the “complete commentary on our constitution.” Here, Professor Guelzo explains the daring act of aggression these lanmark political writings were, and outlines the six themes Hamilton (under the pseudonym “Publius”) believed would demonstrate the indispensability of the new constitution. x
    • 21
      Patrick Henry's Convention
      The fate of the new constitution depending on the state ratifying conventions. And because Virginia's consent was necessary to make the overall ratification process work, neutralizing Patrick Henry was the Federalists' most important task. Go inside the battleground of the ratifying convention at Richmond on June 2, 1788. x
    • 22
      George Washington's Inaugural
      First, examine hurdles to electing George Washington as the first president of the United States. Then, follow the story of how the Constitution finally got its bill of rights, and how this task was undertaken by the one man who most vehemently opposed such a bill: James Madison. x
    • 23
      Alexander Hamilton's Reports
      As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton had the responsibility of handling the new nation's foreign, state, and domestic debts. In this lecture, learn how Hamilton saw debt not as a problem but an asset, and discover how he argued for the establishment of a national bank. x
    • 24
      Thomas Jefferson's Party
      In the past, Thomas Jefferson denounced political parties. Now, after the ratification of the Constitution, he began to form the nation's first political party. Discover how he did this by assembling allies, appealing selected individuals to run for Congress, and playing for control of the media. x
    • 25
      William Findley's Whiskey
      Whiskey, on the frontier of the early Republic, was a major business. So when the national government proposed an excise tax on whiskey, it led to the Whiskey Rebellion. Go back to the summer of 1794 and meet William Findley, a self-styled republican who saw Republican societies as vehicles for political strategy. x
    • 26
      Benjamin Banneker's Survey
      How was the location of the nation's new capital decided upon? How were the streets of Washington organized? What happened when Washington asked Congress for money? It all started, as you'll learn, with Benjamin Banneker's surveying mission of the iconic site on the eastern branch of the Anacostia River. x
    • 27
      John Jay's Treaty
      With a new nation came new international crises. In this lecture, go inside the 28 articles of John Jay's eponymous treaty with Great Britain, which addressed unfinished business from the Treaty of Paris, and the subsequent uproar that gave a boost to polarization between America's political parties. x
    • 28
      John Adams's Liberty
      According to Professor Guelzo, if George Washington was the heart of republic, John Adams was its brain. Follow the Founder as he becomes the first vice president, then the second president of the nation, where he suffers catastrophic blunders that sap him of any political advantages he once had. x
    • 29
      Hector Saint John de Crèvecoeur’s Americans
      Crevècoeur’s Letters from an American Farmer presented Americans at the end of the 18th century as a people unlike any other nation. From this starting point, explore the demographics of the early United Sates, witness the early stirrings of abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements, and probe America’s cultural fear of strangers. x
    • 30
      Timothy Dwight's Religion
      Timothy Dwight, a president at Yale University, played a pivotal role in cementing the early nation's ties with the Christian faith. Come to see how Christianity, when defined and defended as a virtue, was seen by Dwight and others as a necessary component of republican government. x
    • 31
      James McHenry's Army
      Meet another often-overlooked Founder, Secretary of War James McHenry, who was responsible for putting the nation's army into play for the first time. Despite political backstabbing, and against the backdrop of the Quasi-War with France, McHenry brought about military changes still with us today. x
    • 32
      Thomas Jefferson's Frustration
      Focus on some of the many conflicts between Thomas Jefferson’s political philosophies and the reality of American life. Chief among these was his belief that an economy based on the virtuous independent farmer had no need of imports or exports – which led to the controversial Embargo Act of 1807. x
    • 33
      Aaron Burr's Treason
      Aaron Burr's duel with Alexander Hamilton, resulting the latter's death, is one of the most infamous chapters in the history of the Founding Fathers. But, as you'll learn, what's equally important is what happened next: that the Constitution protected even the liberties of someone like him, who meant it harm. x
    • 34
      John Marshall's Court
      Explore the court of Chief Justice John Marshall. In major court cases like Marbury v. Madison and McCulloch v. Maryland, Marshall would devise a national judicial sovereignty to match the constitutional and economic sovereignty envisioned by Madison and Hamilton, and to save the United States from Jacobin Republicanism. x
    • 35
      James Madison's War
      The “age of the Founders” ends with the War of 1812 and James Madison at the helm of government. You’ll learn why the United States was disastrously unprepared for war, and you’ll get a closer look at the state of the nation as it was bequeathed to Madison’s successor, James Monroe. x
    • 36
      Alexis de Tocqueville's America
      In the first part of this last lecture, learn the fates of each of the Founding Fathers discussed in this course. Then, close with a look at Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, which suggests the new nation's focus on self-interest instead of virtue (as well as a lack of art and culture). x
  • The Art of Debate
    Course  |  The Art of Debate

    Professor Jarrod Atchison, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    The Art of Debate offers you the ultimate how-to guide for hashing out differences of opinion and making stronger arguments based on reason and compromise. In 24 stimulating lectures, Professor Jarrod Atchison of Wake Forest University helps you develop your command of logic, construct clear arguments, recognize the fallacies in others’ reasoning, and sharpen your own strategic thinking skills.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The Art of Debate
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      The Hidden Value of Debate
      Find out what we mean when we talk about "debates," and how immersing yourself in the techniques of formal debate can have a dramatic impact on how you make decisions in every aspect of your life. From the business world to the bar room, the process of exchanging ideas will make you a better thinker and citizen. x
    • 2
      When and How to Use Debate
      Debate gives you an honest assessment of an idea, and is therefore a powerful decision-making tool. Here, Professor Atchison walks you through the structure of a formal debate and explores when debate can help you the most. As you will learn, big and future-oriented decisions are ripe for formal discussion. x
    • 3
      The Proposition: Choosing What to Debate
      Now that you know when to debate, shift your attention to what to debate. The "proposition"–the idea up for debate–is one of the most important concepts to understand, and in this lecture, you will survey how to structure the proposition most effectively-and consider who is making the ultimate decision. x
    • 4
      The Structure of Argument
      The claim, the evidence, and the warrant: these three elements provide the structure of a strong argument. Unpack each of these elements by studying what they are, how they work, and how they come together to produce an argument. Then home in on the warrant, which is often the most vulnerable part of an argument-and therefore the element easiest to challenge. x
    • 5
      Using Evidence in Debate
      Examine the strengths and weaknesses of three primary types of evidence: narrative evidence, empirical evidence, and evidence based on authority. As you review each type of evidence, you will see them in action as Professor Atchison applies them to debates about gun control, climate change, and physician-assisted suicide. x
    • 6
      Fallacies in Your Opponent's Research
      To be a great debater, you must not only learn to recognize argument fallacies, but you must also learn to combat them during the debate. This first in a two-part lecture series offers insight to help you identify fallacies that stem from flaws in your opponent's research, including the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy, hasty generalizations, and more. x
    • 7
      Fallacies in Your Opponent's Arguments
      Continue your study of fallacies with a survey of fallacies that stem from the actual debate itself. To make their case, debaters often resort to false analogies, straw men, and ad hominem attacks. Fortunately, once you learn to recognize them, you will be well prepared to combat them and score points to win the debate. x
    • 8
      Elements of a Good Case
      No debate is won without consideration of the audience-of the ultimate decider or the judge. If you can't connect with this audience, you won't be able to win them over. After considering how to make such a connection, you'll then sharpen your skills in creating a well-researched case with enough nuance to argue your point. x
    • 9
      Arguing for the Affirmative
      The affirmative side of a debate must do three things: stay relevant to the resolution, indict the status quo, and offer a proposal designed to solve the problems you have identified with the status quo. Discover how to meet these obligations and build a winning affirmative argument. x
    • 10
      Building Affirmative Cases
      Now that you know how to develop a strong affirmative argument, apply your skills to a specific debate. Taking a resolution about campus carry laws as an example, Professor Atchison walks you through each of the steps to indict the status quo and offer a tenable solution to the problem. x
    • 11
      Arguing for the Negative
      A good critique is a necessary way of testing out an idea, but developing a good negative case requires immense creativity to disprove the affirmative argument. Delve into the key arguments available to the negative: the disadvantages of the affirmative case, counterproposals, and critiques of the affirmative's assumptions. x
    • 12
      Building Negative Cases
      The three-part attack from the previous lecture is an extremely effective way to challenge the affirmative proposal, but the arguments don't attack the affirmative case directly. Here, learn several approaches to confronting the affirmative case head-on, including "inherency," attacking the harms of the affirmative, and attacking the proposal's solvency. x
    • 13
      The Crucible of Cross-Examination
      Once each case is built, it's time for a cross-examination-a chance to interrogate your opponents to better understand their arguments, identify holes in their reasoning, and keep the audience engaged. This first of three lectures explores the history of debate and reflects on the goals of cross-examination. x
    • 14
      Asking and Answering Leading Questions
      Continue your study of cross-examinations with a detailed look at "leading questions." Useful for identifying holes in an argument, leading questions also represent persuasive arguments in and of themselves. Learn the rules of creating a good leading question and how they can help you win the debate. x
    • 15
      Open-Ended Questions: Setting Traps
      Round out your study of cross-examinations by turning to "open-ended questions." Designed to help you understand your opponents' arguments, open-ended questions give you the opportunity to shift your position, thus maximizing strategic flexibility. They also allow you to set traps for your opponent. Find out how to craft-and answer-open-ended questions. x
    • 16
      Essentials of a Persuasive Rebuttal
      No plan survives contact with the enemy, which means no matter how well you've constructed your case, you will need to defend it. Fortunately, there are several straightforward elements of a good rebuttal-assessment, organization, and emotional appeal-and Professor Atchison guides you through each element in this lecture. x
    • 17
      Dealing with the Unexpected in Debate
      We all need to deal with the unexpected in our daily lives, so learning the secrets to navigating the unexpected in a debate has far-reaching applications. Here, see what it takes to slow down, diagnose, analyze, and respond to unexpected arguments. By following a few simple steps, you can easily find your way back to terra firma. x
    • 18
      Even If Arguments: The Essential Weapon
      Now that you have explored the ways to build and defend a strong case, it's time to move on to varsity-level debate skills, starting with "even if" arguments. By starting with the premise that your opponent is right about everything, you can then explain why you should still win the debate-an extremely effective argument if performed well. x
    • 19
      Debate Jujitsu: Flipping the Warrant
      In many great debates, there is a devastating moment where one side clearly out-maneuvers the other. "Flipping the warrant," which requires the highest level of analytic argument, allows you to destroy your opponent's argument by showing that their proposal, rather than solving a problem, will actually make things worse. x
    • 20
      The Power of Concessions
      The best debaters understand the need for strategic flexibility, and concessions are one of the most powerful strategic moves in the playbook. As you will find out in this lecture, conceding points allows you to focus on your best arguments, or get out of a difficult spot, or even set a trap for your opponent. x
    • 21
      Conditional Argumentation
      Although they are two separate fields, the art of debate sometimes employs formal logic with great success. In this lecture, see how "conditional argumentation," a way of employing if-then statements to argue a point, lets you acknowledge a point without agreeing to it-a line of argument that pairs well with "even-if" arguments. x
    • 22
      Line-by-Line Refutation
      Conclude your study of advanced debate techniques with a survey of line-by-line refutation. First, learn how to map out the "flow" of a debate using shorthand. By distilling key ideas, you will be well prepared to respond to all points. Try to map out the "flow" of a test case here. x
    • 23
      Judging Debates: The Art of the Decision
      Debates aid decision-making, and you may one day find yourself in the role of a judge needing to make the big decision. Survey the best way to communicate your reasons for a decision, starting with a short thesis statement followed by an explanation of your reasoning. As an example, consider a nonprofit faced with a difficult business decision. x
    • 24
      Winning the Cocktail Party
      Formal debates have clear structures, but we often debate ideas in informal settings-unpredictable, complicated, ambiguous conversations with blurred lines between judges and participants. Conclude your course with a few handy tips for how to win a debate at a cocktail party-and when to bow out of the discussion. x
  • The Mayo Clinic Guide to Pain Relief

    Professor Barbara K. Bruce, Ph.D., L.P.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    If your life or the life of someone you love has been hijacked by pain, you’re not alone. One out of every three U.S. adults lives with chronic pain. In The Mayo Clinic Guide to Pain Relief with Barbara K. Bruce, Ph.D., L.P., you will learn new science-based behaviors that can lessen your pain, how to build a health care team, and how to create your individualized pain-management program addressing issues of physical stamina, stress management, social support, sleep, and mood.

    View Lecture List (12)
    12 Lectures  |  The Mayo Clinic Guide to Pain Relief
    Lecture Titles (12)
    • 1
      Why Pain Matters
      One out of every three people suffers from chronic pain-pain that either never goes away or returns again and again. Although pain is a universal experience, there are ways you can manage pain effectively - and live an enjoyable and fulfilling life. Learn from case studies of people who have dealt with chronic pain and how their experiences may help you. x
    • 2
      What Is Pain?
      The latest neurological research reveals that the brain's physical, emotional, and cognition centers all play significant roles in our perception of pain. The fascinating neurology of pain reveals why the most effective pain-control programs address the body, the mind, and the body-mind interaction. x
    • 3
      Common Causes of Chronic Pain
      Many conditions can lead to chronic pain, but one more recently discovered cause is central sensitization. This syndrome is caused by dysregulation of the spinal cord, the brain's thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala, and alterations in how pain is experienced. Central sensitization is thought to be the underlying cause of fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and more. x
    • 4
      Medication for Chronic Pain: Why and Why Not
      What are the short-term benefits and the long-term risks of using anti-inflammatories, analgesics, opioids, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and other pharmacological treatments for chronic pain? Learn when drugs can be helpful and when it's time to address the bigger goal of successfully managing chronic pain-and managing life-without them. x
    • 5
      How Exercise Helps with Chronic Pain
      Study after study has shown that exercise releases endorphins, improves blood flow to the brain, reduces fatigue, improves sleep quality, and even helps build emotional resilience. But what's the most significant issue in developing an appropriate exercise program for a person with chronic pain? Moderation. Moderation. And more moderation. Learn why. x
    • 6
      Manage Your Stress to Manage Your Pain
      No matter its cause, stress signals your body to release cortisol-its primary fight-or-flight hormone-which increases your perception of pain, causes more stress, and even doubles the symptoms of pain that you experience. Learn how to break this cycle by identifying and reducing the real stressors in your life and adopting new behaviors that reduce stress and pain. x
    • 7
      Social Support for Pain Management
      Medical research consistently shows that people with rich social support networks are healthier in almost every way. But you might be surprised to learn what type of social support doctors have found most helpful for those with chronic pain, and who benefits. Learn how to initiate, develop, and nurture these significant relationships. x
    • 8
      How to Sleep When You Have Pain
      People with chronic pain are more likely to have sleep problems that impact their daily lives and are three times more likely to be diagnosed with a sleep disorder. Recent research reveals many complex relationships between pain and sleep-and the best ways to get the sleep needed to lessen stress and pain. x
    • 9
      The Vicious Cycle of Pain and Mood
      Symptoms of chronic pain are rarely stable, leading to good days and bad days - and unpredictable changes in mood. It's impossible to completely disentangle chronic pain from mood, especially since the emotions and pain that you feel travel along the same nerve pathways through your body. But help is available for mood disorders, and you can learn how to minimize their impact on your life. x
    • 10
      Building a Pain Management Team
      Do you wish you had one person to lead your health care team? One person to coordinate, explain, and integrate information from your other doctors-to explain all your options and develop the best possible pain-management plan for you? You do. Learn why your primary care physician is almost always best for the job. x
    • 11
      Creating a Pain Management Plan
      Use everything you've learned in the first 10 lectures of this course to create your own effective pain management plan - one that meets your personal goals and identifies the lifestyle interventions that are most appropriate for you in the areas of exercise, stress reduction, social support, improved sleep, and emotional health. x
    • 12
      Active Sessions: Exercise and Relaxation
      Begin two aspects of your pain management plan right now. Let experts gently guide you through physical exercise and meditation practices that will start you on your journey. Learn how to calm your busy mind and improve your chances of directing it where you want it to go-toward relaxation and comfort. x
Video title