Announcing 10 New Releases
Announcing 10 New Releases
  • How to Play Piano
    Course  |  How to Play Piano

    Professor Pamela D. Pike, PhD

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    In 36 accessible lessons, How to Play Piano gives you the building blocks you need to go from an interested novice to expressive and talented player. Blending music theory and history with hands-on examples and step-by-step instruction, Professor Pamela Pike guides you through the basic foundations and advanced techniques of piano playing—and shows you how to practice between lessons to make the most of your study.

    View Lecture List (36)

    In 36 accessible lessons, How to Play Piano gives you the building blocks you need to go from an interested novice to expressive and talented player. Blending music theory and history with hands-on examples and step-by-step instruction, Professor Pamela Pike guides you through the basic foundations and advanced techniques of piano playing—and shows you how to practice between lessons to make the most of your study.

    View Lecture List (36)
    36 Lectures  |  How to Play Piano
    Lecture Titles (36)
    • 1
      Basic Piano Rhythm and Fingering
      Let's start by playing some music! From minute one of this course, you will be at the piano, fingering keys and playing tunes. In this opening lesson, you'll familiarize yourself with the piano, perform a few basic exercises to warm up, and explore some introductory rhythm patterns. By the end of the lesson, you'll know how to play the theme from Beethoven's Ode to Joy. x
    • 2
      Pitch and Off-Staff Notation
      After reviewing the introductory finger patterns you learned in the first lesson, delve into the concepts of pitch and meter. Find out about the concept of measures and different types of notes. Then explore the C major five-finger pattern and play it in action with your first etude. x
    • 3
      Tonic and Dominant Harmony
      The piano is a brilliant instrument because it can be used for both melody and harmony, the lead tune and the accompaniment. In this introduction to harmony, you'll explore the tonic and dominant notes of a scale, and you'll revisit Ode to Joy to better understand these concepts in action. x
    • 4
      Intervals and Basic Notation
      “Tempo” refers to speed in music, and it can be measured with a metronome. Continue working on the interplay of harmony and melody. When you add time to the equation, you can explore “intervals,” or pitches in a scale. You’ve learned enough at this point to study basic notation—the first step toward musical mastery. x
    • 5
      Major Chords and Simple Accompaniment
      Begin to familiarize yourself with the landmark pitches on the staff. By practicing various five-finger patterns (including C major, D major, E major, and A major), you will soon be able to match a tune to a specific tempo. This lesson also introduces the concept of “chords,” a triad of notes that allow for richer accompaniment. x
    • 6
      Fourths, Accidentals, and Relaxation
      Round out your study of the major five-finger patterns, and how “accidentals” (changing a pitch by half a step) work. Jazz around with “When the Saints Go Marching In,” and then learn about the interval of the fourth. Add “Aura Lee”—the folk song Elvis used for “Love Me Tender”—to your repertoire. x
    • 7
      Primary Chords
      Delve more deeply into the concept of chords and see how they can offer a richer harmony than single notes or two-note harmonic intervals. Examine one of the most popular chord progressions: I-IV-V-I (tonic to subdominant to dominant to tonic), one of the most common patterns in Western music. x
    • 8
      Transposition at the Piano
      Transposition—moving a melody from one key to another—is an important skill often under-used in traditional piano lessons for beginners. It provides an opportunity to get to know the different musical keys and can help you jazz around with an old piece of repertoire. Practice transposition with a few melodies, including “Woodland Jaunt.” x
    • 9
      Chord Inversions
      This lesson will enrich your musical life by building the technical foundation upon which piano music is based. Inverted chords (moving the lowest note of a triad up an octave) is a complex musical detail that will open your ears for future lessons. Learn to recognize how inversions look on the staff and the correct fingerings to play them. x
    • 10
      Chord Progressions and Arpeggios
      Here, build on the last lesson about chord inversions and take a deeper look at the dominant chord. Try your hand at transposing a new chord progression into various keys, and then practice some C major cross-hand arpeggios. The move may be tricky at first, but Professor Pike gives you plenty of time to practice. x
    • 11
      Accompaniment Patterns and Sight-Reading
      Find out about a practice technique called “blocking,” which will help you recognize chord patterns more easily—a major step toward sight-reading. Practice three types of accompaniment patterns: the broken-chord pattern, the waltz (3/4 time) pattern, and the Alberti bass pattern. x
    • 12
      Harmonization and Damper Pedal
      In this lesson, you’ll discover the final five-finger pattern—G flat—rounding out your knowledge of key signatures. You’ll continue working to harmonize melodies with the accompaniment patterns you learned in Lesson 11, and you will begin a new technique—using the damper pedal. x
    • 13
      Minor Finger Patterns and Chords
      Now that you are growing comfortable with the major key signatures, shift your attention to the minor finger patterns and chords. You’ll learn several new pieces (“Skip to My Lou” and a minor étude), and you’ll continue practicing your efforts at sight-reading. You will also discover an important new skill: how to harmonize a lead line. x
    • 14
      Articulation: Legato and Staccato
      Playing the piano is as much art as science, so here you will consider several techniques to boost the artistry of your playing. The way you articulate or play notes (also known as staccato and legato) will add personality to your playing. Practice with two new pieces: Gurlitt's At School and Diabelli's Waltz. x
    • 15
      One-Octave Major Scales and Major Intervals
      So far, you’ve been practicing five-finger scales, but in Western music, a complete scale is an octave, or eight notes. Expand your abilities to play full eight-note scales, and practice with C major, G major and D major. In addition to working on your existing repertoire, you’ll add the jazzy “Minor Romp” and “A Turkish Tune” to the mix. x
    • 16
      Dotted Rhythms and Isolated Repetition
      Hone the new musical skills you learned in Lesson 15. After reviewing scales and learning to harmonize a minor melody, you’ll experiment with a new rhythm pattern. Dig into “A Turkish Tune” to isolate problem spots, and then try your hand at a theme from Beethoven’s Minuet in G. x
    • 17
      Secondary Chords and More Dotted Rhythms
      Learning to play the piano is a complex, challenging process, so don’t worry if you feel like you’re hitting a plateau. In addition to expanding your knowledge of theory—including secondary chords—use this lesson as a time to review what you know and assess what needs work. x
    • 18
      Sixteenth Notes and More Secondary Chords
      Secondary chords are those that must go to the primary chord for resolution. Deepen your understanding of secondary chords by improvising with the minor second chord, and then playing around with the third and sixth chords. Deepen your abilities with Beethoven’s Minuet in G and the Harp Étude. x
    • 19
      Compound Meter and Technique
      After reviewing your sight-reading skills to date, going over the Beethoven Minuet again, and revisiting the secondary chord progressions, Professor Pike shows you two new time signatures: 2/4 time and 3/8 time. She also shows you some new music: the peppy “Cheerful Tune” and the “Rocking Étude” to bring compound meter to life. x
    • 20
      Parallel Major and Minor Keys
      Reflect on the relationship between parallel major and minor keys. For example, D major and D minor are not relative keys (like C major and A minor), but they do have an intriguing relationship. In this exploration, you will refine your technique for harmonizing melodies and learn the “Bell Melody” and “Elephant Stroll.” x
    • 21
      Three Forms of the Minor Scale and Syncopation
      Over the past few lessons, you have moved from very basic off-staff rhythms and pitches to much more complicated rhythmic patterns. Today’s lesson takes your knowledge of the minor keys to a whole new level as you examine the natural, harmonic, and melodic forms of the minor scale. Also, witness “syncopation” in action in Swing Low. x
    • 22
      Artistic Expression and More Minor Keys
      Revisit the expressive quality of music and how you can use the techniques you are learning to better convey expression. Professor Pike offers a few tips for where amateurs tend to get distracted with anticipation. Reflect on how musical dynamics are related to the musical line, form, and harmonic progression. x
    • 23
      The Classical Period and Fortepianos
      Learning to play the piano is about more than acquiring, perfecting, and practicing techniques. Understanding the time periods of music history help inform your understanding of practice. Here, start with the Classical period and learn how the piano developed as an instrument. Play Mozart's theme from the Sonata in C. x
    • 24
      Seventh Chords and Sonata Form
      Continue your study of the Classical period with a look at one of the most important forms in piano music: the sonata-allegro. See why the seventh chords are so important for classical music, and then survey the life and music of Haydn. Practice Mozart's Sonata in C and Haydn's Dance in D Major. x
    • 25
      Sight-Reading and Technique
      It’s time. You’ve learned enough about music theory and notation that you are ready to tackle sight-reading head-on. Here, you will be introduced to several new sight-reading pieces as well as a technical étude. You’ll also continue your study of the Dance in D Major and the Sonata in C. x
    • 26
      The Romantic Period and Seventh-Chord Arpeggios
      Shift your attention from the Classical period to the Romantic era, roughly 1800 to 1910. After surveying some of the major historical and intellectual developments of the period, you'll begin work on seventh-chord arpeggios. You'll also learn rules for beginning pieces at the appropriate tempo. x
    • 27
      Extended Arpeggios and Pianist as Artist
      Continue your exploration of piano technique as it developed in the Romantic era. After some warm-up work on scales and extended arpeggios, you will find out what makes Chopin's style so interesting, and what made Liszt such a virtuoso. Conclude with a lullaby from Brahms. x
    • 28
      More Romantic Repertoire
      In this lesson, you will refine much of your existing repertoire. You'll then try your hand at Liszt's Liebestraum. While this piece can be quite challenging for students, Professor Pike has created a special arrangement designed for your current level of ability. Work on adding musical expression to these Romantic-era pieces. x
    • 29
      Sonata Form Revisited
      By now, you have learned enough music from the masters that you are participating in a musical tradition. Revisit the sonata form and consider the modified “mini sonatina” form. Practice with “Brahms’s Lullaby”, Gurlitt’s Waltz in C, Liszt’s Liebestraum, and a theme from Mozart’s Sonata in C. x
    • 30
      The Baroque Era and Harpsichords
      Artistic discipline is defined by having the persistence to continue learning difficult music over an extended period of time. This lesson gives you time to practice what you've learned before traveling back in time to the Baroque era, before the modern piano as we know it was invented. Survey the instruments and style of the period. x
    • 31
      Baroque Repertoire
      After warming up with a waltz, you’ll learn “Rameau’s Minuet,” a piece widely anthologized for music students. Then, go back to the Baroque to learn about Bach’s fugues and Pachelbel’s famous Canon in D. This lesson gives you a chance to refine your skills in harmonization. x
    • 32
      Deliberate Practice and Learning Music
      Through much of this course, you have worked on some challenging masterpieces, many of which require difficult hand shifts and much practice. Here, Professor Pike shares a few strategies for “deliberate practice,” a systematic way to help you through the challenges. Learn a new harmonization example in the key of E minor. x
    • 33
      The 20th Century and Modern Music
      Music in the 20th and 21st centuries comes in many different styles. Here, you will survey a few common trends and find out about some of the more highly regarded composers of the past century, including programmatic music of Jean Sibelius and Béla Bartók, as well as computer-generated sounds and non-traditional piano techniques. x
    • 34
      Chorale-Style Repertoire
      It's good to practice music from different eras to ensure your musical diet is well-balanced. Here, survey chorale-style piano music across the ages. You'll enjoy the hymn-like harmonies in Schumann's Chorale Opus 68 no. 4 as well as the Ode to Schumann. Then, turn to another, more challenging piece by Schumann. x
    • 35
      Impressionism and the Una Corda Pedal
      Like its counterparts in art and literature, impressionism is a powerful musical movement that conveys a vague aural picture through interesting chords and progressions. Claude Debussy is the master of impressionism, and you will review his approach—and see how una corda pedal can help you mirror his sound. x
    • 36
      Triplets and Continuing Piano Study
      Professor Pike concludes with a final rhythmic pattern—triplets. After playing a Hungarian dance, you will try your hand at Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata, a fitting coda for a course that opened with the Ode to Joy. Reflect on what you’ve learned and discover how to continue your study of the piano after this course. x
  • Knitting 101
    Course  |  Knitting 101

    Taught By Multiple Professors

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    In Knitting 101, three experienced instructors lead you through 36 hands-on lessons across four modules, each centered on different methods and levels of experience. You will cover the basics and beyond, from understanding your needles and yarns to mastering various stitches and shapes, so you can create amazing hats, gloves, scarves, and much more.

    View Lecture List (36)

    In Knitting 101, three experienced instructors lead you through 36 hands-on lessons across four modules, each centered on different methods and levels of experience. You will cover the basics and beyond, from understanding your needles and yarns to mastering various stitches and shapes, so you can create amazing hats, gloves, scarves, and much more.

    View Lecture List (36)
    36 Lectures  |  Knitting 101
    Lecture Titles (36)
    • 1
      Module 1 - Lesson 1: Intro to Knitting
      Meet Susan B. Anderson and get a brief introduction to knitting. Then jump to the best part of knitting: the yarn! Learn about the different fibers and sizes to choose from, as well as the best types for beginners. x
    • 2
      Module 1 - Lesson 2: What You Need
      One of the best things about knitting is that it doesn't require a lot of supplies. In this lesson, Susan helps you choose what you need for your projects and shares a few additional tools to stock your knitting bag. x
    • 3
      Module 1 - Lesson 3: Casting On
      This is when the fun begins! Susan shares her tried-and-true method for getting your stitches onto your needles. Then cast on for your very first project: a pair of hand warmers. x
    • 4
      Module 1 - Lesson 4: The Knit Stitch
      Explore the knit stitch, the most basic unit of knitting, and use it to create garter stitch. Then try your hand at two different knitting styles, Continental and English, and decide which one works best for you. Afterwards, you'll add the first rows to your hand warmers. x
    • 5
      Module 1 - Lesson 5: The Purl Stitch, English
      In this lesson, you'll learn the English-style purl stitch. Then, explore a new stitch pattern, the stockinette stitch, by alternating rows of knits and purls. x
    • 6
      Module 1 - Lesson 6: Ribbing, English
      Using the English style of knitting, complete your hand warmers by working the rib stitch pattern. By alternating knits and purls in the same row, you'll create a textured, stretchy finish. See how to manage your yarn as you switch between stitches. x
    • 7
      Module 1 - Lesson 7: The Purl Stitch, Continental
      In this lesson, you'll work the Continental-style purl stitch, holding the yarn in your left hand. Then explore a new stitch pattern, the stockinette stitch, by alternating rows of knits and purls. x
    • 8
      Module 1 - Lesson 8: Ribbing, Continental
      Complete your hand warmers by working the Continental-style rib stitch pattern. By alternating knits and purls in the same row, you'll create a textured, stretchy finish. Learn how to manage your yarn as you switch between stitches. x
    • 9
      Module 1 - Lesson 9: Binding Off
      Whether you’re knitting English- or Continental-style, you'll need a way to get your stitches off the needles and keep them secure. In this lesson, Susan explains what binding off is as you practice on your hand warmers. x
    • 10
      Module 1 - Lesson 10: Finishing
      Once you've finished knitting your hand warmers, seam them and weave in any loose yarn ends. Afterwards, uncover the magic of blocking as you learn to block your own knits. x
    • 11
      Module 1 - Lesson 11: Reading a Pattern
      In order to tackle your favorite knitting projects, you'll need to know your way around the pattern. In this lesson, Susan walks you through each part of a knitting pattern and helps you understand how written instructions translate to actual knitting. x
    • 12
      Module 1 - Lesson 12: Knitting in the Round
      Take your knitting from flat to round by knitting in the round! Discover the best way to cast on and start your round, plus tips for keeping track of where you are and which direction you should be knitting. x
    • 13
      Module 1 - Lesson 13: Waffle Stitch Cowl
      Practice knitting in the round by working the Waffle Stitch Cowl pattern included in your class materials. And, while you're at it, try a new stitch pattern! x
    • 14
      Module 1 - Lesson 14: Shaping
      Shaping opens up a whole new world of creative possibilities for your knitting. In this lesson, you'll practice basic increase and decrease stitches to make your knitting wider or narrower. x
    • 15
      Module 1 - Lesson 15: Changing Colors
      Have fun with your knitting by playing with color! Susan shows you how to knit stripes, both flat and in the round, and shares tips and tricks for changing colors with different stitch patterns. x
    • 16
      Module 1 - Lesson 16: Striped Hat
      Build on your skills by working your next project: a striped pom-pom hat. Practice working in the round, knitting stripes, and using decreases to shape the top of your hat. x
    • 17
      Module 1 - Lesson 17: Fixing Common Mistakes
      Remember, no one knits perfectly the first time around. In this final lesson, Susan helps you fix some common beginner mistakes, and identify what went wrong in the first place! x
    • 18
      Module 2 - Lesson 1: Getting Started With Cables
      Meet Allyson Dykhuizen and begin class by going over everything you'll need to get started. Then dive into your first project, a bulky cabled headband! x
    • 19
      Module 2 - Lesson 2: Cabled Headband
      Get started on your cabled headband. Allyson walks you through the simple cable pattern and how to knit it. You'll practice changing colors and working from written instructions to complete your project. x
    • 20
      Module 2 - Lesson 3: Cabled Hat Setup
      Tackle a slightly more challenging cable pattern as you work your second project, a hat. Allyson reviews the yarn and tools you'll need to get started. Then cast on and start working the bottom of the hat. x
    • 21
      Module 2 - Lesson 4: Cable Charts
      Explore a variety of different cable stitches as you work the pattern repeat for your hat. Find out how to work from a chart and written instructions, and use stitch markers to keep track of your pattern. x
    • 22
      Module 2 - Lesson 5: Finishing the Hat
      Once your cables are done, it's time to finish your hat. Allyson shows you how to decrease for the crown and work on double-pointed needles as your hat gets smaller. After that, weave in the ends and, if you'd like, add a pom-pom! x
    • 23
      Module 2 - Lesson 6: Troubleshooting
      Allyson ends class by troubleshooting common mistakes. Plus, see how to work a cable without a cable needle, a handy trick for those of us that always seem to lose it! x
    • 24
      Module 3 - Lesson 1: The Knit Stitch
      Meet Lorilee Beltman and get started on learning the knit stitch, Continental-style. Whether you're a new knitter or a longtime English-style knitter, you'll appreciate Lorilee's clear instruction for tensioning and positioning the yarn in your hands and making knit stitches flow along your needles with maximum comfort and efficiency. x
    • 25
      Module 3 - Lesson 2: The Purl Stitch
      Get a handle on the purl stitch as Lorilee shows how to hold your yarn and move it into place for your needle to grab quickly and easily. You'll see how to keep awkward movements at a minimum and make sure your stitches are correctly oriented on your needles. x
    • 26
      Module 3 - Lesson 3: Sizing Stitches for Even Knitting
      Depending on how you make your stitches, your knitting might end up too loose or too tight. Lorilee shows how this happens and explains how to make your stitch size just right. x
    • 27
      Module 3 - Lesson 4: Time Savers: Using Knit & Purl Together
      Knitting Continental really comes in handy when you have to alternate frequently between knits and purls, such as in ribbing or seed stitch. Getting the working yarn to the front or back of your knitting is simply a matter of shifting your right hand. Lorilee shows you how to achieve this efficiency and how to keep the transition smooth. x
    • 28
      Module 3 - Lesson 5: Increases, Decreases & Other Maneuvers
      Lorilee walks you through using Continental knitting with all of the common increases, decreases and other stitch maneuvers. With the yarn in your left hand, you'll find you're able to tackle elaborate patterns with ease! x
    • 29
      Module 3 - Lesson 6: Using Continental for Your Favorite Fabrics
      Whether your favorite fabric includes lace, cables, linen stitch or even two-handed colorwork, Lorilee's got you covered. She shares her tips for tackling each with Continental knitting, including how to cable without a cable needle. Linen stitch and colorwork, especially, will be so much easier if you know how to hold the yarn with your left hand. x
    • 30
      Module 3 - Lesson 7: Troubleshooting & Practice
      The way you hold your knitting might be causing you some pain. Lorilee shows some common pitfalls to avoid so that you can continue to enjoy your knitting. Similarly, you might find yourself struggling with keeping your tension and your stitches even. Lorilee shares troubleshooting strategies. Finally, learn about some small, fun projects you can work on as you practice your newfound Continental knitting skills! x
    • 31
      Module 4 - Lesson 1: Starting Out: Cast-On & Transitional Bands
      Meet popular instructor Lorilee Beltman and start by reviewing the yarn and tools that work best for Continental projects. Then, tackle the provisional cast-on, pick up tips for transitioning between differing stitch counts and find out how to use yarn markers to keep track in your work. x
    • 32
      Module 4 - Lesson 2: Slipping Stitches: Tunisian & Linen
      The beautiful Tunisian knit stitch is loaded with yarn overs and slip stitches -- and Continental style lets you streamline all the steps! Find out how, before Lorilee demonstrates a classic Tunisian pattern: the three-color linen stitch. To work this gorgeous pattern, you'll move the yarn from back to front and back again. x
    • 33
      Module 4 - Lesson 3: Mosaic Knitting
      Make mosaic stitch faster and easier with Continental knitting! This classic colorwork style only knits one color at a time, slipping stitches after the yarn is brought forward or back. Lorilee will show you how to work it in Continental and help you troubleshoot along the way. x
    • 34
      Module 4 - Lesson 4: Textured Solids: Cables & More
      Explore rich textures such as cables to make your knitting pop! Lorilee guides you through cabling without a cable needle or ever having to let go of your yarn. Then, discover some Gansey-style stitch patterns that are achieved by simply switching back and forth between knits and purls. When knit in Continental style these patterns work up faster than ever! x
    • 35
      Module 4 - Lesson 5: Vertically Stranded Colorwork & Lace
      Find out how Continental knitting makes vertically stranded colorwork and even colorwork lace easier. Lorilee shows you how to work your main color entirely by picking, throwing in the occasional contrast stitch as you go. Then, get some practice with your cowl's colorwork lace motif to hone your yarn overs, increases and decreases. x
    • 36
      Module 4 - Lesson 6: Stranded Colorwork & Finishing
      In the standard style, stranded colorwork requires both of your hands to work together. But in the Continental style, your free hand provides added control for faster, more approachable stranding. Follow along for a step-by-step breakdown before Lorilee walks you through grafting the ends of your cozy new cowl together. x
  • The Architecture of Power: Great Palaces of the Ancient World

    Professor Steven L. Tuck, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    In The Architecture of Power: Great Palaces of the Ancient World, tour awe-inspiring structures of the ancient world with Professor Steven L. Tuck. As you make your way through these storied sites—some of which no longer exist—you’ll also delve into an exploration of the meaning of power and the ways it operated in societies across the globe.

    View Lecture List (24)

    In The Architecture of Power: Great Palaces of the Ancient World, tour awe-inspiring structures of the ancient world with Professor Steven L. Tuck. As you make your way through these storied sites—some of which no longer exist—you’ll also delve into an exploration of the meaning of power and the ways it operated in societies across the globe.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The Architecture of Power: Great Palaces of the Ancient World
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Palaces Past and Present
      Begin your tour of the ancient world by a look at our modern one as you explore the palaces of Saddam Hussein. Discover how he called upon the ancient Egyptians and Babylonians for inspiration and also how the architecture changed over time in response to threats from Iran and the United States. x
    • 2
      Malkata Palace: Pharaoh, Foreigners, and Gods
      Now, travel back to the 14th century BC, a time of peace, prosperity, and plentitude for Egyptians. Learn how the Malkata Palace represents a microcosm of Egypt. Architectural details reveal little-known facts about religious rituals and telling insights into how pharaohs attempted to assert their domination over others. x
    • 3
      Amarna: Palace of the First Sun King
      Pharaoh Amenhotep IV takes on a new name—Akhenaten—and shifts Egypt's capital to the fascinating city of Amarna. See how his worship of the sun disk defined an era built on temple crops, sacrifices, and complete subservience to the pharaoh. Also learn how relocating his seat of power helped Akhenaten wrestle authority away from religious leaders. x
    • 4
      Phaistos: Palaces between Asia and Europe
      Archaeology often involves a great deal of detective work, as is the case with the mysterious Bronze Age Crete. The myth of Daedalus and his labyrinth symbolizes Crete's location at the intersection of multiple cultures. Discover the Phaistos Palace, where extravagant religious rituals and entertainment spectacles were held. x
    • 5
      Palace of Nestor at Pylos and Bronze Age Greece
      Explore the Palace of Nestor, an extraordinary complex centered around the throne room. We travel in time from the immense treasures discovered in 2015 back to the ancient styles the Mycenaeans developed to bring these elaborate structures to life. Consider what the arrangement of rooms reveals about how royals lived and maintained control. x
    • 6
      The Assyrian Palace at Nimrud: Empire in Stone
      The Assyrian palace at Nimrud, with its imposing 20-foot gates, was designed by Ashurnasirpal II. An epic braggart, he loved to write of his conquests of nature and his knowledge of tree species. Clearly an intellectual, he describes in detail the glory of feasts he threw—and the math behind them. x
    • 7
      Nineveh: The Architecture of Assyrian Power
      Discover the last great Assyrian palace and the largest city the world had ever seen before the Babylonian conquest. See how its designers accomplished incredible civil engineering feats, diverting entire rivers into canals that offered protection and transportation. Also meet the magnificent lamassu guardians that flanked the palace entrances, each of which stood over 12 feet tall. x
    • 8
      Persepolis: Palace of the Persians
      The lore of Persepolis includes the exploits of many great kings. Explore the great citadel at Persepolis with its famed flight of 111 steps leading to the Gate of All Nations, which held a set of wood and bronze doors standing 20 feet high. Learn of the spectacular stone masonry and powerful art filled with lions and mythological creatures. x
    • 9
      Greek Palaces in Conquered Lands I
      While scholars debate the details, it's undeniable that Alexander the Great's conquest of the Persian Empire profoundly changed the world. View his astonishing palaces, boasting gymnasiums and enormous swimming pools and home to elite drinking parties. Examine the unmistakable Greek style blended with Persian and Assyrian influences characteristic of the period. x
    • 10
      Greek Palaces in Conquered Lands II
      This is the tale of two palaces—one in Jordan, the other in Libya—in the wake of Alexander the Great’s death. Both were products of military expansion and occupation, but they displayed distinct identities. Learn how the palace origins influenced the design and layout of each. x
    • 11
      Greek Palaces Come to Roman Italy
      Two men, Marcus Claudius Marcellus and Lucius Licinius Lucullus, were largely responsible for the transformation of Roman architecture; their story is one of political strategy, Persian influence, and sheer determination. Consider why Lucullus may be the most important yet underrated figure in the history of palace creation. x
    • 12
      Masada: Herod the Great between East and West
      Herod the Great is a well-studied, yet controversial, figure. Examine in depth his brilliant methods and materials, including the construction of Masada, which involved many logistical challenges as giant marble tesserae slabs were shipped across the desert and hoisted up as walls. Discover Herod's most startling and mesmerizing architectural invention. x
    • 13
      Herod the Great's Summer and Winter Palaces
      Herod was a complex king whose royal image was defined by insecurity, innovation, and a need to reflect his Jewish identity. Starting with his heated Roman baths in each palace, understand how the king was a master of the land and was able to give his people a marvelous oasis in the desert. x
    • 14
      Caligula's Floating Palaces
      Taking inspiration from Cleopatra as well as the ancient Hellenistic rulers, Caligula's Floating Palaces included all the amenities you would expect to find onboard modern cruise ships: spacious baths, banquet halls, and live music. Caligula, himself, is also quite fascinating, as is the story of the ships' rediscovery. x
    • 15
      Nero's Domus Transitoria at Rome
      A huge fan of spectacle, Nero sponsored grand chariot races and began an architectural revolution. We find Nero's palaces made of a new Roman concrete where bespoke designs could finally replace the utilitarian boxes of stone, thus making way for domed ceilings, custom columns, and any form he desired. x
    • 16
      Nero's Golden House: A Roman Palace Theater
      Nero built the infamous Domus Aurea (Golden House), a 124-acre Xanadu that enraged the rich whose land he occupied. It featured a lavish watered garden with incredible rotating sculptures that could spray perfume. Walking distance from the Colosseum, this palace was literally covered in gold. x
    • 17
      Rome's Great Imperial Palace of Domitian
      The word "palace" comes from the Palatine Hill in Rome, which housed Domitian’s 200-year-old palace. This structure—impeccably built and placed—was essentially the White House for Roman emperors. Learn why the enormous residence and its innovative design was mythologized by poets, who compared Domitian to Jupiter. x
    • 18
      Hadrian's Villa, Tivoli
      Hadrian was an artistic genius who personally designed the palace of his dreams to reflect his many passions, including his love of Greek philosophy. His luxurious villa, now a UNESCO world heritage site, set the standard for Roman architecture. Understand more about Hadrian, a figure so influential that he redefined the concept of Virtus, or manliness. x
    • 19
      Diocletian's Retirement Palace, Split
      Diocletian came to power in the 3rd century AD, a turbulent time for the Roman Empire, which had seen 25 emperors over the course of 50 years. Learn how Diocletian, a visionary and problem-solver, brought stability to the empire and how his palace represented a radical departure from traditional styles. x
    • 20
      Constantine's Palace, Constantinople
      Constantinople was a fresh start for the then-600-year-old Roman Empire, becoming the greatest European city of the Middle Ages. Its founder, Constantine, was (supposedly) a devout Christian. Explore his palace, which featured colossal sculptures and the famed hippodrome, where chariot races, animal hunts, and prisoner executions were held. x
    • 21
      China's Endless Palace: Weiyang Palace
      Weiyang, China's Endless Palace, represented not only an emperor but the very concept of ever-expanding empire itself. Covering an area of 1,200 acres, it was the largest imperial palace ever built. You'll learn how the construction of the palace reflected imperialism as well as Confucianism, the cornerstone of Chinese philosophy. x
    • 22
      The Palace of Montezuma II at Tenochtitlán
      The Aztec capital, founded in a swamp, developed into the largest city in the Pre-Columbian Americas. Meet Montezuma II, creator of Tenochtitlán, a staunch believer in omens, and father to hundreds. Learn how a Spanish army of a few hundred men led by Hernan Cortes conquered an empire of millions. x
    • 23
      Renaissance Palaces and the Classical Revival
      Here we visit such highlights of Renaissance architecture as Kensington Palace and the Tuileries Palace and discover how they were influenced by classical forms. Perhaps most impressive is the Palace of Versailles, which boasted Europe's largest orange tree collection and now attracts tourists from all over the world. x
    • 24
      Palaces in a World of Democracies
      In this final lecture, reflect on the timeless themes explored in this course. First, investigate the White House, where each decorative decision reflects political agenda (and defiance to the previous administration). Then, discover the surprising connection between the Amazon headquarters and ancient imperial palaces as ancient ideas come full circle in our modern era. x
  • Understanding Russia: A Cultural History

    Professor Lynne Ann Hartnett, PhD

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    In a time when the eyes of the Western world are drawn to Russia and her role on the world stage, it’s amazing how little many of us really know about it. Blending history with cultural studies, the 24 lectures of Understanding Russia: A Cultural History bring you closer than ever to the Russian people through the poetry of Pushkin, the comfort of early folk tales, the faith of medieval iconography, the avant-garde films of Eisenstein, and more.

    View Lecture List (24)

    In a time when the eyes of the Western world are drawn to Russia and her role on the world stage, it’s amazing how little many of us really know about it. Blending history with cultural studies, the 24 lectures of Understanding Russia: A Cultural History bring you closer than ever to the Russian people through the poetry of Pushkin, the comfort of early folk tales, the faith of medieval iconography, the avant-garde films of Eisenstein, and more.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Understanding Russia: A Cultural History
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      A Russian Past, the Putin Future
      As you start your journey into the heart of Russian history and culture, consider several themes you'll encounter throughout these lectures. Among them: the enormity of Russia's geography, its desire for power, and its search for an organic cultural identity. Then, explore the beginnings of Russia in the land known as Rus'. x
    • 2
      Ivan the Terrible's 500-Year Reign
      For better and worse, Ivan the Terrible’s reign has become a cultural and historical symbol of Russian leadership. Was he really terrible—or just awe-inspiring? How did he use cultural symbols to create a spectacle of autocracy? And to what extent did he set the standard for subsequent centuries of Russian leadership? x
    • 3
      The Russian Orthodox Church
      In this lecture, examine the fascinating relationship between the Russian state and the Russian Orthodox Church. Along the way, you'll assess how religion, as practiced by the Russian masses, changed church institutions (and how the Russian state responded in turn) and the extraordinary influence of the Russian church on state culture. x
    • 4
      Peter the Great and a European Empire
      What makes the Russian ruler Peter deserving of the title “great”? The answer lies in looking at how he transformed a minor power on the periphery of Europe into a formidable empire, how he embraced Western culture, and how he spearheaded transformations (including calendar reforms) to create a new European capital. x
    • 5
      Russia's Northern Window on Europe
      Modern Russian culture was born in the city of St. Petersburg, built on the shores of the Gulf of Finland in the early 18th century. It's here where you'll witness the dawning of the Russian Elizabethan Age: a time of extravagance and cultural energy that produced wonders in everything from architecture to opera. x
    • 6
      Nobility, the Tsar, and the Peasant
      The political alliance the Russian nobility forged with the Romanov regime facilitated Russian expansion—but at tremendous cost to the Russian masses. Here, Professor Hartnett explores some of the many fissures in the tsarist system that led to popular resentment of the Russian nobility and made the country ripe for revolution. x
    • 7
      The Authentic Russia: Popular Culture
      Russian popular culture, produced by the masses of uneducated peasants, can be described as a culture of sentimentality rooted in religious devotion and the agricultural calendar. Here, explore everything from superstitions and folk tales and Stenka Razin’s “myth of rebellion” to the popularity of Russian baths (banya), vodka, and nesting dolls (matryoshkas). x
    • 8
      Catherine the Great and the Enlightenment
      In this lecture, explore the powerful legacy of Catherine the Great, who would extend the empire westward and accomplish what even Peter the Great had been unable to do: establish Russian dominance of the southern regions. You'll also learn how Catherine fueled Enlightenment-inspired developments in politics, architecture, and more. x
    • 9
      Alexander Pushkin's Russia
      To understand the poet Alexander Pushkin’s literary significance, you must understand the Russia in which he lived. Here, explore how Pushkin (today recognized as Russia’s greatest poet) intersected with significant events, trends, and individuals, and how he created works including the novel Eugene Onegin and the poem, “The Bronze Horseman.” x
    • 10
      Alexander II, Nihilists, and Assassins
      Focus on the reign of Alexander II, who ruled Russia from 1855 to 1881. Central to this lecture are three questions: Why did this promising reign end so violently? Did Alexander II shape developments in literature and culture? How could Russia's last great tsar inaugurate a violent confrontation between the state and its people? x
    • 11
      The Age of Realism in Russian Art
      Dive into the age of artistic realism, whose artists are among the most celebrated in all of Russian culture. As you meet composers like Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, writers like Ivan Turgenev, and painters like Ilya Repin, you'll learn how artists found their muse in the history and traditions of Russia. x
    • 12
      Russian Fin de Siecle and the Silver Age
      By the end of the 19th century, Russian artists were helping to make Russian culture among the most exceptional in the world. Here, take a closer look at the cheeky apathy of Anton Chekhov's plays, the Bolshoi Theater and the Ballets Russes, decorative arts from the House of Faberge, and more. x
    • 13
      Empire across Two Continents
      Chart the tsars’ development of a grand Eurasian empire. You’ll consider the commonalities Russian colonizers shared with their Western counterparts, explore incursions into Alaska and Siberia, examine the Napoleonic and Russo-Turkish wars, and investigate the policy of “Russification,” designed to make the empire’s European areas “more Russian.” x
    • 14
      The Rise and Fall of the Romanovs
      Get the real story behind the Romanov dynasty, from its rise to power in 1613 to its bloody end in 1917—a tale filled with adventure, intrigue, romance, and heartbreak. It was this period that saw the Decembrist revolution, the assassination of Tsar Alexander II, and the machinations of the notorious Grigori Rasputin. x
    • 15
      Russian Radicals, War, and Revolution
      On October 26, 1917, a new era in Russian history began. In the first of two lectures on the October Revolution, explore the events that led up to this epoch-making moment, including the devastation of World War I, the repressive rule of Tsar Nicholas II, and the ideas of Vladimir Lenin. x
    • 16
      The October 1917 Revolution
      Examine the Bolshevik seizure of power during the October Revolution and its immediate aftermath. You'll explore the Bolsheviks' attempt to implement a utopian vision through the barrel of a gun, and you'll also investigate how the revolution created a system where violence was a typical tool of statecraft. x
    • 17
      Lenin and the Soviet Cultural Invasion
      Professor Hartnett reveals how Lenin and the Communist Party aimed to win the hearts and minds of the Soviet people through a cultural battle fought on every possible front. See how this battle was won through a militarized economy, propaganda radio, the renaming of streets, and the “secular sainthood” of Lenin. x
    • 18
      The Roaring Twenties, Soviet Style
      The Russian Revolution wasn’t just about changing politics. The Bolsheviks also attacked Russia’s traditional religious, sexual, and social norms. Here, examine how the Soviets built a new proletarian culture that had powerful ramifications for education, women, religion, folk songs—and even cinema. x
    • 19
      The Tyrant Is a Movie Buff: Stalinism
      Stalin and his cadre aspired to transform everyday Russian life (byt) in ways that brought forth such horrors as collectivization and the gulags. But, as you'll learn, this was also a period where the creative work and cultural influence of writers, composers, and painters were suppressed by the terrifying mandates of Socialist Realism. x
    • 20
      The Soviets' Great Patriotic War
      By the time World War II ended, the Soviets would lose 27 million men, women, and children from a total population of 200 million. In this lecture, examine Soviet life during the Great Patriotic War and investigate how culture (including poetry and film) was used in service of the war effort. x
    • 21
      With Khrushchev, the Cultural Thaw
      Nikita Khrushchev emerged from the power struggles after Stalin’s death with a daring denunciation of the dictator’s cult of terror and personality. As you examine Khrushchev’s liberalization of culture, you’ll also explore its limits, including the continuation of anti-Semitism from the Stalin era, embraced under the guise of “anti-cosmopolitanism.” x
    • 22
      Soviet Byt: Shared Kitchen, Stove, and Bath
      What was everyday Soviet life like during the Khrushchev and Brezhnev periods? How and where did people live? How did they spend their leisure time? Answers to these and other questions reveal the degree to which politics affected even seemingly apolitical areas of life. x
    • 23
      Intelligentsia, Dissidents, and Samizdat
      In this lecture, explore the culture of intellectual dissent in Russian history. Professor Hartnett reveals how Russia’s intellectuals and artists (including writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn and nuclear physicist Andrei Sakharov) played a unique, important role in challenging the status quo of autocratic rule—often at the expense of their freedom. x
    • 24
      Soviet Chaos and Russian Revenge
      On December 25, 1991, the Soviet Union came to an end. Follow the road that led to this moment under the policies of perestroika (restructuring the centrally-planned economy) and glasnost (removing rigid state censorship). Then, conclude with a look at the rise of a new popular leader: Vladimir Putin. x
  • Math and Magic
    Course  |  Math and Magic

    Professor Arthur T. Benjamin, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Taught by award-winning math professor and professional magician Arthur T. Benjamin of Harvey Mudd College, this course shows the math behind magic through dozens of tricks based on mathematical principles. You’ll learn the algebra that explains card tricks, the shortcuts to lightning-fast mental calculations, and other marvels of the magician’s art—all while impressing your friends, family, and yourself.

    View Lecture List (12)

    Taught by award-winning math professor and professional magician Arthur T. Benjamin of Harvey Mudd College, this course shows the math behind magic through dozens of tricks based on mathematical principles. You’ll learn the algebra that explains card tricks, the shortcuts to lightning-fast mental calculations, and other marvels of the magician’s art—all while impressing your friends, family, and yourself.

    View Lecture List (12)
    12 Lectures  |  Math and Magic
    Lecture Titles (12)
    • 1
      Mathematical Card Tricks
      Begin the course with card tricks in which mathematics is clearly being used, but the secret is not easy to figure out. Learn the invariant principle: Some qualities stay the same in a deck even though the order of cards is changing. End with what Professor Benjamin calls the tear-able" trick, being careful to use cards that you don't mind wrecking." x
    • 2
      What's Your Deal?
      Explore card tricks in which the cards are shuffled, dealt, and flipped over in interesting ways, leading to surprising outcomes. Discover Hummer's principle-an endless source of mystifying, crowd-pleasing tricks, based on random mixing of cards combined with a simple procedure that preserves a pattern that seems positively magical. x
    • 3
      Look like a Card Shark
      Professor Benjamin shows how to play cards like someone who would be thrown out of a casino. Learn the Jonah principle for always winning at poker. Get a feel" for counting cards and develop the knack for telepathically communicating a hidden card to an assistant. Finally, who could claim to be a card shark without a trick that turns up four aces every time?" x
    • 4
      The Deck Is Stacked
      Investigate tricks based on the cyclic method of card ordering, or stacking," popularized by magician Si Stebbins and tracing originally to one of the first books on magic, published in Italy in 1593. Learn how to seemingly weigh a deck of cards in your hands and other miraculous feats based on this simple principle." x
    • 5
      Perfect Shuffles
      Professor Benjamin introduces a special guest, mathematician and magician Brent Morris, master of the perfect shuffle (also known as the faro shuffle), in which two equal halves of the deck are interlaced perfectly. You will learn two versions of this virtuoso technique-the in-shuffle and out-shuffle-along with sequences of shuffles that lead to very interesting symmetries. x
    • 6
      Riffle Shuffles
      Explore results of an ordinary riffle shuffle, where the deck is cut roughly in half, and the cards are interlaced approximately-but usually not perfectly. Depending on how the cards are arranged beforehand, intriguing effects are possible, based on Gilbreath's principle of patterned sequences. Study several of these magic showpieces. x
    • 7
      Magic with Numbers
      Master an impressive medley of number-guessing tricks, involving the golden ratio, the Fibonacci series, and other notable numbers. In analyzing how the tricks work, discover how straightforward algebraic expressions are secretly pulling the strings. The feats include the very first mathematical magic trick that Professor Benjamin learned. x
    • 8
      Look like a Genius
      You don't have to be a genius to look like one. Drawing on young volunteers, Professor Benjamin shows easy strategies for mentally multiplying numbers by 11, dividing numbers by 91, multiplying any numbers near 100, squaring numbers ending in 5, and other seemingly fearless feats of arithmetic, without use of a calculator. x
    • 9
      The Magic of Nine
      Admire the magic of the number nine. An ancient technique called "casting out nines" lets you pick out the missing digit in a bewilderingly long series of operations. Then learn to determine two-digit cube roots and also find the age of a volunteer who has hidden the number in a complicated calculation-all with the help of the number nine. x
    • 10
      Look like a Psychic
      Hone your psychic powers by developing tricks such as these: Have someone scramble their birthday in a seemingly unbreakable code, which you decipher with ease. Calculate the hidden spots on a stack of dice. Use the parity principle to guess where your partner has landed in an alphabetic array. Also learn the magician's toxic" calculation principle." x
    • 11
      Geometric and Topological Magic
      Explore mathematical mysteries that seem geometrically or topologically odd. Consider a paper strip with a half twist, joined end-to-end, known as a Mobius band. What happens when there are more twists or if the shape is cut? Create an analogous shape by slicing a bagel. Also, solve puzzles with disappearing figures, including a rabbit. x
    • 12
      Magic Squares
      Since ancient times, magic squares have given endless hours of fun through designing grids of numbers where each row, column, and diagonal produces the same sum-as if by magic. In this last lesson, learn to create magic squares quickly from numbers provided by your amazed audience or based on your volunteer's birthday. Finally, end the course with a magic matrix based on the number pi. x
  • How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader's Guide

    Professor Beth Cabrera, PhD

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    The profit of companies with the strongest focus on employee experience is about four times higher than the average. In How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader’s Guide, Professor Beth Cabrera provides a step-by-step guide to create a thriving work environment, based on the science of positive psychology. In the process, not only will your bottom line improve, but so will the lives of your employees—and your own life, as well.

    View Lecture List (12)

    The profit of companies with the strongest focus on employee experience is about four times higher than the average. In How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader’s Guide, Professor Beth Cabrera provides a step-by-step guide to create a thriving work environment, based on the science of positive psychology. In the process, not only will your bottom line improve, but so will the lives of your employees—and your own life, as well.

    View Lecture List (12)
    12 Lectures  |  How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader's Guide
    Lecture Titles (12)
    • 1
      Workplace Well-Being: The New Frontier
      What's the next competitive frontier in business? It's the relationship between employee experience and company success. Learn about the exciting new research showing a clear link between employee well-being and your company's bottom line. x
    • 2
      Mindfulness at Work: The Power of Presence
      While most of us believe multi-tasking increases our productivity, scientific studies reveal the opposite. Explore why mindfulness has proven to be a better path to emotional well-being and optimal work performance. Discover how to develop and implement the practice of mindfulness in your life. x
    • 3
      Positive Outlook, Positive Performance
      Can starting your day off with a few smiles really make a difference in your work performance? Yes! Discover how positive emotions can impact our brain structure and chemistry, resulting in significant psychological, cognitive, social, and health benefits that can improve work performance. x
    • 4
      Fostering Employee Optimism and Hope
      Optimism and hope are two powerful ingredients in the recipe for a thriving workplace, and studies have confirmed their correlation to the bottom line. Explore the important differences between these two concepts and the specific ways in which employees can learn to shift from pessimistic or hopeless attitudes to more optimistic and hopeful ones. x
    • 5
      The Advantage of Workplace Relationships
      Our brains are wired for social interaction, and research has confirmed that our relationships with others significantly impact both our ability to thrive and our work performance. Find out how to foster high-quality social connections among employees and how those connections can have a positive impact. x
    • 6
      Encouraging Generosity and Compassion
      Scientists now believe nature rewarded not only the fittest, but also the kindest. Explore how to foster generosity and compassion in the workplace, and the many ways in which these qualities lead to stronger relationships and greater productivity. Also, explore the benefits of self-compassion. x
    • 7
      Creating an Inspiring Learning Environment
      We all want to learn and grow throughout our careers, yet some people are more open to learning new concepts and skills than others. Find out how leadership can create an environment of psychological safety, curiosity, and creativity, which will inspire all employees to learn, grow, and thrive. x
    • 8
      Engaging Your Workforce: The Power of Flow
      We’re familiar with the concept of athletes and artists experiencing “flow” or being “in the zone.” They report performing almost effortlessly while time goes by unnoticed when they are fully engaged in their work. Discover how creating more opportunities for flow at work and adopting a strengths-based leadership approach can benefit both your employees and your organization. x
    • 9
      The Need for Meaning: Making Work Matter
      Many people look to their work for a sense of fulfillment and meaning. But meaning doesn't come from the specific task performed; it is derived from an individual's understanding of the task's purpose. Explore the many ways to help employees understand how their work and the company's collective activities serve colleagues, customers, and community. x
    • 10
      Promoting Workplace Resilience
      The modern workplace can be a stressful environment. But whether that stress is harmful or helpful depends on an individual’s mindset—a mindset that can be changed. Examine specific strategies that can help develop resilience. A more resilient workforce can lead to increased performance and decreased employee turnover. x
    • 11
      Strategies for Employee Health
      The research is clear that a few well-planned front-end investments in employee health can prevent significant costs later on. Explore the many ways in which workplace environment and culture can promote better health through exercise, eating habits, sleep, rest, and relaxation. x
    • 12
      Autonomy: Empowering Employees to Succeed
      Autonomy—the feeling of being in control and having the ability to accomplish your goals—is one of the most powerful components of well-being, and companies where employees have greater autonomy significantly outperform competitors. Learn the best ways to give up a bit of control, even though it’s difficult for most of us. It will be well worth the effort. x
  • Introduction to Astrophysics

    Professor Joshua Winn, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD
    Taught by Professor Joshua Winn of Princeton University, this course takes you step by step through the major calculations of astrophysics, including Newton’s law of gravity, a black hole’s event horizon, the ignition temperature of a star, and many more. Knowledge of first-year college physics and math is assumed, but Dr. Winn—an award-winning teacher—makes the course rewarding for anyone curious about the universe.
    View Lecture List (24)
    Taught by Professor Joshua Winn of Princeton University, this course takes you step by step through the major calculations of astrophysics, including Newton’s law of gravity, a black hole’s event horizon, the ignition temperature of a star, and many more. Knowledge of first-year college physics and math is assumed, but Dr. Winn—an award-winning teacher—makes the course rewarding for anyone curious about the universe.
    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Introduction to Astrophysics
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Zooming Out to Distant Galaxies
      Begin by defining the difference between astrophysics and astronomy. Then study the vast range of scales in astrophysics—from nanometers to gigaparsecs, from individual photons to the radiation of trillions of suns. Get the big picture in a breathtaking series of exponential jumps—zooming from Earth, past the planets, stars, galaxies, and finally taking in countless clusters of galaxies. x
    • 2
      Zooming In to Fundamental Particles
      After touring the universe on a macro scale in the previous lecture, now zoom in on the microcosmos—advancing by powers of ten into the realm of molecules, atoms, and nuclei. Learn why elementary particles are just as central to astrophysics as stars and galaxies. Then review the four fundamental forces of nature and perform a calculation that explains why atoms have to be the size they are. x
    • 3
      Making Maps of the Cosmos
      Discover how astrophysicists map the universe. Focus on the tricky problem of calculating distances, seeing how a collection of overlapping techniques provide a “cosmic distance ladder” that works from nearby planets (by means of radar) to stars and galaxies (using parallax and Cepheid variable stars) to far distant galaxies (by observing a type of supernova with a standard intrinsic brightness). x
    • 4
      The Physics Demonstration in the Sky
      In the first of two lectures on motion in the heavens, investigate the connection between Isaac Newton's laws of motion and the earlier laws of planetary motion discovered empirically by Johannes Kepler. Find that Kepler's third law is the ideal method for measuring the mass of practically any phenomenon in astrophysics. Also, study the mathematics behind Kepler's second law. x
    • 5
      Newton's Hardest Problem
      Continue your exploration of motion by discovering the law of gravity just as Newton might have—by analyzing Kepler’s laws with the aid of calculus (which Newton invented for the purpose). Look at a graphical method for understanding orbits, and consider the conservation laws of angular momentum and energy in light of Emmy Noether’s theory that links conservation laws and symmetry. x
    • 6
      Tidal Forces
      Why are the rings around Saturn and the much fainter rings around Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune at roughly the same relative distances from the planet? Why are large moons spherical? And why are large moons only found in wide orbits (i.e., not close to the planets they orbit)? These problems lead to an analysis of tidal forces and the Roche limit. Close by calculating the density of the Sun based on Earth's ocean tides. x
    • 7
      Black Holes
      Use your analytical skill and knowledge of gravity to probe the strange properties of black holes. Learn to calculate the Schwarzschild radius (also known as the event horizon), which is the boundary beyond which no light can escape. Determine the size of the giant black hole at the center of our galaxy and learn about an effort to image its event horizon with a network of radio telescopes. x
    • 8
      Photons and Particles
      Investigate our prime source of information about the universe: electromagnetic waves, which consist of photons from gamma ray to radio wavelengths. Discover that a dense collection of photons is comparable to a gas obeying the ideal gas law. This law, together with the Stefan-Boltzmann law, Wien's law, and Kepler's third law, help you make sense of the cosmos as the course proceeds. x
    • 9
      Comparative Planetology
      Survey representative planets in our solar system with an astrophysicist's eyes, asking what makes Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Jupiter so different. Why doesn't Mercury have an atmosphere? Why is Venus so much hotter than Earth? Why is Jupiter so huge? Analyze these and other riddles with the help of physical principles such as the Stefan-Boltzmann law. x
    • 10
      Optical Telescopes
      Consider the problem of gleaning information from the severely limited number of optical photons originating from astronomical sources. Our eyes can only do it so well, and telescopes have several major advantages: increased light-gathering power, greater sensitivity of telescopic cameras and sensors such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), and enhanced angular and spectral resolution. x
    • 11
      Radio and X-Ray Telescopes
      Non-visible wavelengths compose by far the largest part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Even so, many astronomers assumed there was nothing to see in these bands. The invention of radio and X-ray telescopes proved them spectacularly wrong. Examine the challenges of detecting and focusing radio and X-ray light, and the dazzling astronomical phenomena that radiate in these wavelengths. x
    • 12
      The Message in a Spectrum
      Starting with the spectrum of sunlight, notice that thin dark lines are present at certain wavelengths. These absorption lines reveal the composition and temperature of the Sun's outer atmosphere, and similar lines characterize other stars. More diffuse phenomena such as nebulae produce bright emission lines against a dark spectrum. Probe the quantum and thermodynamic events implied by these clues. x
    • 13
      The Properties of Stars
      Take stock of the wide range of stellar luminosities, temperatures, masses, and radii using spectra and other data. In the process, construct the celebrated Hertzsprung–Russell diagram, with its main sequence of stars in the prime of life, including the Sun. Note that two out of three stars have companions. Investigate the orbital dynamics of these binary systems. x
    • 14
      Planets around Other Stars
      Embark on Professor Winn's specialty: extrasolar planets, also known as exoplanets. Calculate the extreme difficulty of observing an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star in our stellar neighborhood. Then look at the clever techniques that can now overcome this obstacle. Review the surprising characteristics of many exoplanets and focus on five that are especially noteworthy. x
    • 15
      Why Stars Shine
      Get a crash course in nuclear physics as you explore what makes stars shine. Zero in on the Sun, working out the mass it has consumed through nuclear fusion during its 4.5-billion-year history. While it's natural to picture the Sun as a giant furnace of nuclear bombs going off non-stop, calculations show it's more like a collection of toasters; the Sun is luminous simply because it's so big. x
    • 16
      Simple Stellar Models
      Learn how stars work by delving into stellar structure, using the Sun as a model. Relying on several physical principles and sticking to order-of-magnitude calculations, determine the pressure and temperature at the center of the Sun, and the time it takes for energy generated in the interior to reach the surface, which amounts to thousands of years. Apply your conclusions to other stars. x
    • 17
      White Dwarfs
      Discover the fate of solar mass stars after they exhaust their nuclear fuel. The galaxies are teeming with these dim “white dwarfs” that pack the mass of the Sun into a sphere roughly the size of Earth. Venture into quantum theory to understand what keeps these exotic stars from collapsing into black holes, and learn about the Chandrasekhar limit, which determines a white dwarf’s maximum mass. x
    • 18
      When Stars Grow Old
      Trace stellar evolution from two points of view. First, dive into a protostar and witness events unfold as the star begins to contract and fuse hydrogen. Exhausting that, it fuses heavier elements and eventually collapses into a white dwarf—or something even denser. Next, view this story from the outside, seeing how stellar evolution looks to observers studying stars with telescopes. x
    • 19
      Supernovas and Neutron Stars
      Look inside a star that weighs several solar masses to chart its demise after fusing all possible nuclear fuel. Such stars end in a gigantic explosion called a supernova, blowing off outer material and producing a super-compact neutron star, a billion times denser than a white dwarf. Study the rapid spin of neutron stars and the energy they send beaming across the cosmos. x
    • 20
      Gravitational Waves
      Investigate the physics of gravitational waves, a phenomenon predicted by Einstein and long thought to be undetectable. It took one of the most violent events in the universe—colliding black holes—to generate gravitational waves that could be picked up by an experiment called LIGO on Earth, a billion light years away. This remarkable achievement won LIGO scientists the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics. x
    • 21
      The Milky Way and Other Galaxies
      Take in our entire galaxy, called the Milky Way. Locate Earth’s position; then survey other galaxies, classifying their structure. Use the virial theorem to analyze a typical galaxy, which can be thought of as a “collisionless gas” of stars. Note that galaxies themselves often collide with each other, as the nearby Andromeda Galaxy is destined to do with the Milky Way billions of years from now. x
    • 22
      Dark Matter
      Begin with active galaxies that have supermassive black holes gobbling up nearby stars. Then consider clusters of galaxies and the clues they give for missing mass—dubbed “dark matter.” Chart the distribution of dark matter around galaxies and speculate what it might be. Close with the Big Bang, deduced from evidence that most galaxies are speeding away from us; the farther away, the faster. x
    • 23
      The First Atoms and the First Nuclei
      The Big Bang theory is one pillar of modern cosmology. Another is the cosmic microwave background radiation, which is the faint “echo” of the Big Bang, permeating all of space and discovered in 1965. The third pillar is the cosmic abundances of the lightest elements, which tell the story of the earliest moment of nucleosynthesis taking place in the first few minutes of the Big Bang. x
    • 24
      The History of the Universe
      In this last lecture, follow the trail of the greatest unsolved problem in astrophysics. Along the way, get a grip on the past, present, and future of the universe. Discovered in the 1990s, the problem is “dark energy,” which is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate. Trace this mysterious force to the lambda term in the celebrated Friedmann equation, proposed in the 1920s. x
  • How to Paint
    Course  |  How to Paint

    Professor Ricky Allman, MFA

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    How to Paint immerses you in the painting process from start to finish, with step-by-step demonstrations in every lesson. Professor Allman’s years of experience as an artist and teacher enable him to provide the perfect introduction to an immense artistic tradition, infusing each session with passion and humor, so even the most technical and traditional methods become fun and approachable under his guidance.

    View Lecture List (24)

    How to Paint immerses you in the painting process from start to finish, with step-by-step demonstrations in every lesson. Professor Allman’s years of experience as an artist and teacher enable him to provide the perfect introduction to an immense artistic tradition, infusing each session with passion and humor, so even the most technical and traditional methods become fun and approachable under his guidance.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  How to Paint
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      The Painter's Toolkit
      Begin by learning how to embrace the physicality, messiness, and freedom inherent in the earliest stages of a painting. Professor Allman demonstrates how to practice loose, dynamic paint strokes using your entire arm—not just your fingers and wrist—and also goes over some of the basic supplies you will use when starting out. x
    • 2
      Getting Started: Surfaces and Brushwork
      You have your (acrylic) paints and your brushes, now what? First, learn what kinds of surfaces are best for beginning painters and how to choose the one that works for you. Then, follow Professor Allman as he walks you through a demonstration on creating gradients, and get to know the kinds of brushes you will use to achieve different lines and effects. x
    • 3
      Fundamentals: Establishing Value
      Value—the spectrum of light and darkness in an image—is crucial to the way our brains translate images into meaning. See why understanding value is more important than understanding color, and develop your ability to pinpoint value differences in your subjects. Follow along with a demonstration on how to break an image down into its fundamental values. x
    • 4
      Fundamentals: Building Volume
      This lesson opens with a brief look at the rendering of three-dimensional forms using light and shadow, known as volume, and why it is easier to achieve than you might think, once you know how to look at the effects of light. Paint geometric objects using your new understanding of light sources, cast shadows versus form shadows, and reflective effects. x
    • 5
      Fundamentals: Basics of Color Theory
      Understanding color is about discerning the subtle differences in value, hue, and saturation. Professor Allman introduces practical color theory and shows you how to break colors down into a simple matrix so you can create the shades you need. Learn how to directly mix paints and the principles of optical mixing as you create your own 12-step color wheel and value scales. x
    • 6
      Fundamentals: Creating Color Palettes
      Why is color like musical notes? In this second look at color, learn how context and interaction is key, and why a limited palette of four or five colors can be surprisingly powerful. Create a quick painting from a monochrome reference image, using just four colors, while utilizing ratio, value, and temperature to do the heavy lifting of the piece. x
    • 7
      Fundamentals: Compositional Choices
      Step beyond the basics and explore broader elements of painting. Look at arrangement and composition, exploring ideas of symmetry, hierarchy, dynamics, and more. Discover why traditional approaches like the Golden Ratio aren't the only options for arranging your work, and end with a sketching session to explore how to plan your work before you start painting. x
    • 8
      Putting It All Together: A Simple Landscape
      Apply everything you have learned so far and paint a simple landscape with acrylic paints, based on a photographic reference. Professor Allman goes over all the tools you will use and leads you through the process of sketching, beginning with mapping major, medium, and small value areas and finishing with details. x
    • 9
      Creating Linear Perspective
      Like value and volume for objects, linear perspective will help you create the appearance of architectural space on a 2-D surface. Though it can be challenging for even experienced artists, the principles are actually fairly simple. Master elements of linear perspective and then put them into practice as you follow along with Professor Allman's demonstration. x
    • 10
      Creating Atmospheric Perspective
      Explore the ways you can create the illusion of large distances using the techniques of atmospheric perspective, including making objects more or less distinct and creating contrast between the foreground, middle ground, and background. Practice creating a grand sense of space with a simple landscape of hills and mountains. x
    • 11
      Putting It All Together: A Still Life
      Hone your observational skills and develop your personal creative perspective as you tackle a still life composition. Professor Allman's demonstration will help you bring together all the techniques you have learned so far while still allowing you to arrange your own subject and to make crucial decisions about value, proportion, and more. x
    • 12
      Working with Oils
      Oil paints have been the most popular painting medium since the European Renaissance. Transition from acrylics to the traditional realm of oil paints, exploring the many benefits—blending and transitions, texture, the rich pigments—while also learning how to deal with some of the more challenging aspects, such as varied drying times and toxicity. x
    • 13
      Traditional Oil Techniques: Grisaille
      Continue your foray into oil painting, starting with the versatile, monochromatic underpainting technique known as grisaille. Create an underpainting from a reference image, utilizing paint that has been thinned to create a smooth surface for the overpainting. After your underpainting is complete and dry, progress to adding thin, luminous layers of color. x
    • 14
      Working with Acrylics
      Return to acrylics to explore their advantages and disadvantages and how to use techniques that are particularly suited to them: glazing, sanding, and masking. Explore different mediums you can incorporate to slow drying time or change paint consistency, and watch Professor Allman as he begins work on a street scene in acrylics. x
    • 15
      Playing with Mediums
      If you don't touch paintings, why is surface texture so important? As it turns out, the visual surface quality of a painting can trigger the area of the brain that processes tactile sensations. Experiment with mediums you can incorporate into your acrylic paints to create a variety of textures, from high-shine glosses to gritty pumice to the watercolor-effect of absorbent ground. x
    • 16
      Painting Water and Clouds
      Dive into the challenging diversity of the natural world, starting with bodies of water and clouds. First, identify common elements and look closely to determine color temperature and value areas. Then, work from simple structure to finer details as you build up your painting. Finally, add shadows and highlights to capture shape and atmospheric conditions. x
    • 17
      Painting Trees and Bark
      Take advantage of the immense varietyies of trees to create natural compositions and experiment with various shapes and textures. Professor Allman leads you through a demonstration focused on building up different types of trees from basic shapes to foliage and bark texture, including techniques to suggest leaves and needles without excessive detail. x
    • 18
      Painting Rocks and Mountains
      It's not what you paint that makes an interesting work: It's how you paint it. Even something as mundane as a rock can be compelling; as you will see as you undertake a study of rocks using chromatic grays. Learn how to create shades of gray from complementary colors as Professor Allman captures the variety and complexity of stone in a simple landscape. x
    • 19
      Painting Light
      You have looked at the interaction of light and shadow, now broaden your look at the effect of light through the lens of the four main aspects you should know: type of light source, brightness, color, and direction. Professor Allman's demonstration focuses on several strategies for painting light using a candle as your source and subject. x
    • 20
      Painting Glass
      Engage with a subject that can intimidate even seasoned painters: glass. Learn how to focus on what can be seen through glass objects, rather than on the glass itself, to capture its unique properties. Undertake a simple glass still life, using highlights and shadows to suggest shape rather than outlining or blocking. x
    • 21
      Painting People
      In the age of instant photography, why paint portraits? Professor Allman discusses the amazing ability of portraits to capture truths about both the subject and the artist, as he introduces you to the proportions of the human face and then demonstrates how to build" your portrait in much the same way you have tackled previous subjects." x
    • 22
      Getting Creative: Composition
      Up to this point, Professor Allman has focused on the tools and techniques of representation. Now, turn your attention to the ways you as an artist can explore new ideas and techniques to tap into your own creativity. Consider how to find and use a variety of references and materials, closing with an exercise in painting using tape to explore the figure-ground relationship. x
    • 23
      Getting Creative: Surface and Texture
      Further stretch your creative horizons as you leave traditional tools behind and explore new materials and techniques. Featuring four different demonstrations, this lesson will show you how to utilize unique painting surfaces, paint with palette knives instead of brushes, incorporate other media into your paintings, and add collage to your repertoire. x
    • 24
      Getting Creative: Space and Dimension
      Conclude your lessons by freeing yourself from the boundaries of realistic space and, with some guidance from the work of M. C. Escher, use perspective in inventive ways. Learn how to let go of the constraints of realism and transform the two-dimensional surface of your painting into a space where your imagination can take flight. x
  • Investigating American Presidents

    Professor Paul Rosenzweig, JD

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    What limits are there—if any—on presidential power? How do we keep such power in check? In the 12 timely lectures of Investigating American Presidents, Paul Rosenzweig of The George Washington University School of Law guides you through the ins and outs of presidential investigations, using past scandals and controversies as a lens through which to make sense of current (and future) ones.

    View Lecture List (12)

    What limits are there—if any—on presidential power? How do we keep such power in check? In the 12 timely lectures of Investigating American Presidents, Paul Rosenzweig of The George Washington University School of Law guides you through the ins and outs of presidential investigations, using past scandals and controversies as a lens through which to make sense of current (and future) ones.

    View Lecture List (12)
    12 Lectures  |  Investigating American Presidents
    Lecture Titles (12)
    • 1
      American Presidents and the Rule of Law
      How does the investigation of a U.S. president's misconduct differ from an investigation into the misconduct of a private citizen? After exploring the roots of the presidency and presidential power as outlined in the Constitution, consider the advantages and disadvantages a president has during an investigation. Then, Professor Rosenzweig explains why this subject is essential knowledge for any American citizen. x
    • 2
      Presidential Investigations through History
      Presidential crises and abuses of power aren't just features of modern times. Early executive scandals have had significant long-term effects that resonate down the corridors of time. Learn how we're still dealing with the fallout of famous (and sometimes overlooked) investigations into abuses of presidential power, including Ulysses S. Grant's Whiskey Ring and Warren G. Harding's Teapot Dome scandal. x
    • 3
      Separation of Powers and the Presidency
      Today, legislative and judicial oversight of the presidency are a permanent part of American government and critical to limiting and restraining the possibility of executive abuse. In this lecture, learn how our system of checks and balances came to exist-with, among other things, a close look at the landmark judicial review case, Marbury v. Madison. x
    • 4
      Watergate and the Special Prosecutor
      The names of the Watergate burglars are mostly forgotten-but the consequences of their arrest brought down President Richard Nixon. Topics in this lecture include two important Supreme Court cases that shaped a president's power to dismiss personnel, as well as the Independent Counsel Act, which established a truly independent form of investigative authority. x
    • 5
      Rise and Fall of the Independent Counsel
      After the Nixon presidency, Congress and the American public became convinced that an independent investigator function was essential. Twenty years later, they let that function expire. Why did that happen, and what's replaced it? Follow the swing from the special prosecutor of the Nixon era to the independent counsel of the Reagan and Clinton eras back to the special counsel leading the investigation of Russian election hacking and the 2016 Trump campaign. x
    • 6
      Can a Sitting President Be Indicted?
      Assume for a moment that there exists convincing evidence of a president's criminality. What does that do to the country's management? Is it legal to indict a sitting president? Or does the president in question just "get away" with it? Ponder these and other intriguing questions about whether or not a president is in a class of his/her own when it comes to indictments. x
    • 7
      Presidential Use and Abuse of Privileges
      Depending on where you sit, testimonial privileges are either barriers to the truth or limitations on the disclosure of sensitive information. Using the Whitewater and Lewinsky scandals that swirled around President Bill Clinton and his lawyer, Bruce Lindsey, in the late 1990s, explore the topics of attorney-client privilege and executive privilege (the right of the president to withhold information from public scrutiny). x
    • 8
      Presidents, Prosecutors, and Public Opinion
      The most significant confrontation between a president and a president's investigators happens not in a court of law but in the court of public opinion. Often, the storyline" is the deciding factor in how an investigation will be seen by future historians. Examine four different tactics used by President Bill Clinton and his team that helped them achieve a public relations victory." x
    • 9
      The Pardon Power and Its Limits
      Investigate the use (and possible misuse) of presidential pardons. Start by looking at two general types of pardons in American history: the justice and mercy" pardon and the "peacefulness" pardon. Then, focus on key questions about the presidential pardon power: Can American presidents pardon co-conspirators for crimes they've committed, thereby frustrating an investigation? Can they pardon themselves?" x
    • 10
      Presidential Lies and Cover-Ups
      Presidential lies can undermine our belief in the fairness of our system of government and our faith in its legitimacy. In this lecture, focus on how the president isn't special when it comes to certain matters of law and evidence (lying under oath, obstruction of justice, and grand jury subpoenas)-as well as some key caveats to this view. x
    • 11
      The Value of Investigative Reports
      Even if formally cleared of wrongdoing, a president or a presidential aide may live with the stigma of investigation forever thanks to an independent counsel's report. First, explore why many investigations typically happen behind closed doors. Then, turn to how the rules are different for presidents and their senior staff (and whether or not that's a good idea). x
    • 12
      The Law and Politics of Impeachment
      Conclude this lecture series with a study of the nuclear option" in presidential investigations: impeachment. Learn why impeachment is inevitably as much a political event as a legal one-and why, when a presidency is on the line, public opinion is at least as powerful a determinant of the outcome as the laws that are on the books." x
  • Masters of Mindfulness: Transforming Your Mind and Body

    Taught By Multiple Professors

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    Mindfulness as a practice is very simple and its effects are well-documented. What many people don’t realize is the breadth of the science behind it and how much of our health—physical, mental, emotional—is bound up in the way we look at and experience the world. Now, modern biology and neuroscience can actually quantify many of the effects of mindfulness and you may be surprised by how powerful the impact can be. In Masters of Mindfulness: Transforming Your Mind and Body, 11 top researchers and proponents of mindfulness discuss what modern science and contemporary research have revealed about this ancient practice and the many ways in which it can benefit your life.

    View Lecture List (22)

    Mindfulness as a practice is very simple and its effects are well-documented. What many people don’t realize is the breadth of the science behind it and how much of our health—physical, mental, emotional—is bound up in the way we look at and experience the world. Now, modern biology and neuroscience can actually quantify many of the effects of mindfulness and you may be surprised by how powerful the impact can be. In Masters of Mindfulness: Transforming Your Mind and Body, 11 top researchers and proponents of mindfulness discuss what modern science and contemporary research have revealed about this ancient practice and the many ways in which it can benefit your life.

    View Lecture List (22)
    22 Lectures  |  Masters of Mindfulness: Transforming Your Mind and Body
    Lecture Titles (22)
    • 1
      What You Practice Grows Stronger
      Mindfulness, the art of being fully present, allows practitioners to see clearly and respond effectively. It can strengthen our immune system, decrease stress, increase cognitive function, and allow us to feel more compassion. With Dr. Shauna Shapiro, explore your own purpose for engaging on a journey of mindfulness with respect to intention, attention, and attitude. Given that what you practice grows stronger, what do you want to practice in your own life? x
    • 2
      Essential Themes of Mindfulness
      In this session with Dr. Shapiro, open by engaging in a meditation exercise to gather intention and center yourself in the present moment. Explore common questions about mindfulness, from concerns about maintaining focus to dealing with feelings of tiredness and even physical pain, and learn how to begin your own mindfulness practices and how to set goals you can commit to. x
    • 3
      Using Mindfulness to Grow Inner Resources
      Wouldn't it be wonderful if you could become stronger and more resilient throughout the course of your life by developing new inner resources to address challenges and vulnerabilities? As Dr. Rick Hanson will show you, you can. Although our brain evolved to scan the world for the negative in order to keep us safe, learn how the practice of mindfulness can help you grow inner resources by using positive neuroplasticity. x
    • 4
      Hardwiring Inner Resources: HEAL
      Chances are you have a lot of positive experiences in your life right now. But are they fleeting—do you even truly notice them? Learn how a mindfulness practice can help you convert positive experiences into long-term beneficial traits, through self-correcting positive neuroplasticity, what Rick Hanson calls “the superpower of superpowers.” x
    • 5
      Mindfulness in Heartbreak
      Because we are human, heartbreak or loss will come to us at some time in our lives. Author Kristine Carlson shares powerful stories of loss and grief, and the role her mindfulness practice played in her healing process. She explains how practicing mindfulness now can even help you better face difficult times in the future. Learn how to access peace, even when joy might not be present. x
    • 6
      Embracing Change and Choosing Growth
      Learn how you can really be of service to another person in his or her time of grief—and what actions and words are more harmful than helpful. Is it possible to reframe the concept of loss so you can move through it with an attitude of embracing the transformation and change? Kristine Carlson shows how your own mindfulness practice can help fill the gaping hole in your life caused by loss with the fullness of the present moment. x
    • 7
      A Mindful Approach to Anger
      We’re always glad to be mindful of our emotions of gratitude, awe, or joy. But what about anger? With Juna Mustad, an expert in “mindful anger,” learn why our normal reactions to anger—either allowing it to drive our actions or stuffing it deep inside—are unhealthy. Learn how to become mindful of your anger, and how that awareness can point you to a healthier, more authentic life and better relationships with others. x
    • 8
      Getting to Know Your Anger
      Neuroscience reveals why we tend to act more quickly on our feelings of anger than any other emotion. We often regret acting out of anger, but what can we do about it? Learn how a mindfulness practice can help you take more appropriate action in response to anger by affecting your body chemistry and growing new connections in specific parts of the brain in this second session with Juna Mustad. x
    • 9
      Mindfulness at Work: The Power of Authenticity
      Author and former professional baseball player Mike Robbins brings a unique perspective to the workplace. As a baseball player, he noticed that the most successful teams were not necessarily those with the greatest individual talent but those with the greatest chemistry and support between players. Mr. Robbins shares techniques to help you create that chemistry and support in the workplace by creating an atmosphere of mindful authenticity. x
    • 10
      Mindfulness at Work: The Power of Appreciation
      Continue your look at mindfulness in the workplace with Mike Robbins. Understand the difference between recognition and appreciation and why appreciation in the workplace can increase employee satisfaction, retention, productivity, and overall mental health. Learn how the mindfulness practice of gratitude can make a difference in your life—both in the workplace and in your personal relationships. x
    • 11
      The Benefits of Brain Training
      Our ability to pay attention and stay focused on a task is incredibly important for our productivity and safety—and often the safety of others. But the attention system in our brain is easily affected by our moods and stress. Are there exercises we can do to train our brain? And, if so, does that training show benefits over time? Join Dr. Amishi Jha to explore brain training from a new perspective. x
    • 12
      Mindfulness as Brain Training
      Dr. Amishi Jha shares her lab's exciting research on the effects of mindfulness-based training programs on cognition, emotion, and resilience. While other types of brain training do not seem to result in long-term benefits, mindfulness training can positively impact the physical structure and functioning of the brain, especially in the three distinct brain networks related to attention and focus. x
    • 13
      The Science of Mindful Aging
      Recent scientific discoveries reveal not only the mechanisms of aging at the cellular level, but also how our mental activities affect those processes. With Dr. Elissa Epel, learn how your activities—including a mindfulness practice—can affect inflammation; the length of the telomeres that protect our chromosomes; the health of our mitochondria, our cells’ centers of energy production; and our epigenome, the chemical compounds that turn our genes on and off. x
    • 14
      Positive Behaviors That Slow Aging
      See how changes you make in your mental and emotional life can affect aging at the cellular level and why the effort it takes to explore some of life’s biggest questions—your own purpose, the meaning of your relationships, and more—is worth your while. Dr. Elissa Epel discusses what neuroscience reveals about the ways in which your social life and personal relationships impact your physical rate of aging. x
    • 15
      Mindful Sex: Being Present in Your Body
      What do you think about during sex? Jessica Graham’s work reveals that many of us are focused on how we look, what our partner thinks about us, how we’re “performing”—all thoughts that take us outside our body. Instead, learn how mindful sex allows you to better access the pleasure in your own body, create a deeper connection with your partner, and enjoy your own sexuality more than ever before. x
    • 16
      Beyond the Orgasm: Communicate and Flow
      Orgasm anxiety (is our orgasm too fast, too slow, not happening at all?) takes us away from sexual pleasure. But mindful sex can refocus our attention on the body’s innate sexual feelings without judgment, allowing us to relax into pleasure. Jessica Graham shares the concept of “flow” meditation as well as ways mindfulness can help forge better communication between partners, deepening both pleasure and meaningful connection. x
    • 17
      Awe: A Defining Human Emotion
      Join Dr. Dacher Keltner and learn why awe is called a defining human strength and how this emotion and phenomenon differs significantly from beauty and astonishment. What do people report as their main sources of awe, and how does it make them feel? Why is an awareness of awe a central part of the human experience? x
    • 18
      How Can You Find More Awe?
      Why does emotion emerge in mammalian evolution and what role does the emotion of awe play in human development? Dr. Dacher Keltner takes you on an exploration of what scientists have discovered about the cross-cultural universality of awe and its physical, mental, and social benefits—and specific ways in which you can experience awe more often in your own life. x
    • 19
      Blue Mind: The Healing Power of Water
      What has neuroscience revealed about the importance of our connection to the natural world and especially our connection to water? Can a mindful connection with lakes, rivers, and oceans—or even the ordinary water we drink—heal the stress and busyness of our modern lives? Learn the ways in which our brain and body are hardwired to respond positively to water with marine biologist and “water evangelist” Dr. Wallace J. Nichols. x
    • 20
      Go Deeper: The Seven Ages of Water
      Dive into the seven ages of water, from birth to death, and explore the many ways in which water impacts our emotional lives. From play to romance to flotation therapy, Dr. Nichols shows how being mindful of water can increase your mental and physical health, and why many scientists refer to water as medicine. Whether you live by the ocean or in the desert, learn how to make “Blue Mind” a part of your life. x
    • 21
      Mindsight: Understanding Your Inner Life
      Our minds include our subjective experience, consciousness, and information processing. But how does this all come together? With Dr. Dan Siegel, learn why self-organization is one of the key attributes of all complex systems, including the healthy mind. Discover how that quality of integration predicts the quality of mental health, and how the practice of mindfulness can take us from the states of rigidity and chaos to healthy integration. x
    • 22
      The Wheel of Awareness: A Model for Well-Being
      Dr. Siegel shares his guided mindfulness meditation called “Wheel of Awareness.” With this practice, you’ll learn to integrate four main aspects of life and mind: the five senses, internal bodily sensations, mental activity and emotions, and relationship to the outside world. More than 10,000 individuals have experienced the Wheel of Awareness, integrating these four aspects of the life of the mind to create better mental health. x